Pollution

Laste ikon
LOADING CONTENT

Must we sacrifice nature to mitigate climate change?

The magnets in wind turbines come from China, and the materials in our electric car batteries are for the most part sourced from Congo. Today, key minerals and metals are being transported to Europe from politically unstable countries far away. Is it possible to safeguard access to these raw materials here in Norway? In this article, we present three research-based strategies for addressing the problem.

BLOG

Innovative recovery of valuable raw materials from ‘red mud’

Waste slags from the metallurgy industries often contain valuable materials, but in very small concentrations. This means that large areas of valuable land are used to accommodate reservoirs filled with what is sometimes toxic waste. We now want to use hydrogen to convert this waste into a resource.

VIEWPOINTS

Corrosion forecast technology can cut costs and reduce waste

High energy prices highlight the importance of the thousands of kilometres of insulated pipe networks and equipment in industrial plants. However, corrosion under the pipes’ insulation is hard to detect and can have severe consequences. New surveillance technology being developed by SINTEF can help combat this looming threat.

Illustration photo of peacock with feathers out

Nature’s colours can replace toxic pigments

Dye pigments are often toxic, so researchers around the world have long been looking for effective ways to make non-toxic, recyclable and sustainable colours instead. The answer lies in nanotechnology and nature’s own methods.

Plastic waste piled up at Mausund feltstasjon

A natural gem is being destroyed by plastic

Mausund and the Froan Nature Reserve are located in an archipelago far out to sea along the Trøndelag county coast, but they are not exactly pristine. About 25 per cent of the soil in the area contains plastic.