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Global supply chains as a way to curb carbon emissions

The coronavirus outbreak raised everyone’s awareness of the significance of global supply chains to modern economies. But global supply chains also play an important role in greenhouse gas emissions. How they are managed can either increase or decrease carbon emissions, new research shows.

Working from home does not make us less productive

Current research into teamwork is showing that we do not become less productive working from home, provided that we work intelligently and are equipped with tools that enable us to work together with our colleagues. In this article, researchers will be advising us not only on what works, but also on what isn’t so smart.

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Game-based learning platform free for the remainder of the school year

Teachers across the globe are working hard to provide classes online for the millions of students who are homebound because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Kahoot, an online interactive learning platform that has its roots in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is offering free premium access to help teachers enrich their online offerings.

Cracking the code to sea cucumber farming

Sea cucumbers are internationally known as a superfood, as they contain many healthy substances. They are highly sought after by both Chinese restaurants and health food manufacturers. However, many sea cucumber species are threatened with extinction, so researchers want to farm them commercially – on land.

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Thinking outside the box of fossils

During the time of Darwin, anthropogeny was the study of human origins. Its sub-discipline paleoanthropology has since taken over, which focuses on fossils found in dry parts of Africa. These fossils don’t tell us much about why or where humans actually evolved.

Place names describe Scandinavia in the Iron and Viking Ages

Every now and then, researchers are lucky enough to experience a Eureka moment — when a series of facts suddenly crystallize into a an entirely new pattern. That’s exactly what happened to Birgit Maixner from the NTNU University Museum when she began looking at artefacts and place names.

A revolution in vaccine development – but will we all benefit?

By manipulating the “instruction manuals” that control cell function in our bodies, we will soon be able to combat many diseases, including the new coronavirus outbreak. However, in the worst scenario, such innovations will only benefit the rich.

Instagram makes it easier to exercise

People who followed researchers’ motivational posts on Instagram got more enjoyment out of their training sessions. Just a couple of minutes over the course of four weeks was enough to make a difference.

Norway’s Nobel laureates take up the fight against Alzheimer’s

Developing an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is the long-term goal of a new national research centre in Norway. Nobel laureates Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser will lead the K. G. Jebsen Centre for Alzheimer’s Disease, aimed at determining how Alzheimer’s disease arises in the brain and its early stages of development.

Abandoned cropland helps make Europe cooler

As nations prepare to mitigate climate change, decision makers need to understand how land use fits into the climate equation. A new study looked at land use changes over two decades and found a major shift from cropland to forests.  That change made western Europe cooler.

Preparing ourselves for extreme events

As wildfires raged through the Swedish forests in 2018, a new set of European resilience management guidelines for dealing with crises was demonstrating its potential usefulness to decision-makers. Applying these recommendations can save many lives and protect major infrastructure assets during cross-sectoral accidents and crises.

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Following sea trout minute by minute

Sea trout populations have declined sharply. Researchers have studied the life of sea trout by means of acoustic telemetry tags and listening stations. Now they know more about what we need to do to protect the sea trout population.

Your sewage is valuable muck

A world without phosphorous is a world without life.  But phosphorous is a finite resource, so researchers are recovering it from sewage.

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Towards a sustainable term for sustainability

The concept of sustainability has long been incorporated into our collective vocabulary. The word is used in many contexts, including in the PR industry. If we are going to find a way out of the climate and environmental crisis, maybe it should be replaced?

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Are robots designed to include the queer population?

Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. However, are the perspectives of minority groups, such as the LGBTQ+ community, considered in robot and AI development?

A new thermal insulation bag will save lives

It is very likely that the human body develop hypothermia following an accident. Maintaining a patient’s body temperature on the way to hospital can be crucial to survival. The prototype of a new and improved solution is now ready.

State’s large investments smarter than many people think

From the press coverage, you might expect only wasted time and projects built over budget when the government invests in roads, buildings and other large projects. But the state — in Norway, anyway — doesn’t do a bad job after all.

More people and fewer wild fish lead to an omega-3 supply gap

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential components of healthy diets for both humans and fish. The dramatic increase in fish farming worldwide has boosted the demand for omega-3 fatty acids so much that today’s supply can’t meet demand. Reducing waste and finding new sources can help.

PAI – a training tool to keep you young

Research from NTNU is now being integrated into millions of smartwatches worldwide. You work on a single training goal, and the fitness tracker tells you if you reach that goal. It may be the key to staying healthy.