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A man holds a large trout

Why aren’t sea trout thriving anymore?

Sea trout numbers are declining in Norway and scientists don’t know why. They have studied the trout in two rivers in northern Norway’s Nordland county. Soon, sea trout along the entire Norwegian coast will be investigated.

Some sparrows sitting in a tree

Inbreeding detrimental for survival

Inbred birds don’t live as long and have fewer offspring than non-inbred birds. Inbreeding is equally harmful regardless of where the birds live.

A woman secretly watches her partner cheat on her

How women and men forgive infidelity

Men and women react differently to different types of infidelity. But new findings about how we forgive cheating by our partners surprised researchers.

Best players are passionate about football

Sogndal football teams from Vestland county in Norway have now been studied by specialists. Football coaches often consider the players with the greatest passion and grit to be the best.

Mann i hvit frakk sitter på laboratorium der han ser på solcelle han holder i hendene.

Searching for the secret to more efficient solar cells

The search for the perfect solar cell is not yet over. Norwegian researchers are now adopting a new approach to the cells’ raw material, crystalline silicon, with the aim of making the electricity-generating cells even more efficient.

How to get good at disagreeing

Do you hesitate to speak up when you disagree with the rest of the group? Are the others not saying anything either? Then you’re probably not maximizing your collaboration. But you can learn how to disagree more effectively.

New lessons from the worst oil spill disaster ever

Ten years ago, the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven men and resulted in the largest accidental oil spill in history. Years of investigations concluded that the drilling crew missed critical warning signals that would have stopped the problem. A new analysis suggests that wasn’t the case.

Why Climate Sceptics are Wrong

Tired of people claiming that the climate crisis isn’t real? You’re not the only one. This is why they are wrong.

Panthera leo’s family tree takes shape

Once upon a time, lions were the world’s most widespread mammals. Now we know more about their genealogy – and that could make it easier to help the species survive.

BLOG

How a Plasma Gasifier Can Reduce CO2 Emissions

CO2 emissions are generally recognized as something we need to avoid. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could just transform the CO2 into useful substances? Plasma technology has been proposed as a way to achieve this, and we have studied the feasibility of the concept from physical, chemical and economical points of view.

Sound beacons support safer tunnel evacuation

Research conducted as part of the project EvacSound demonstrates that auditory guidance using sound beacons is an effective aid during the evacuation of smoke-filled road tunnels. This is good news. It is a fact that vehicle drivers and passengers cannot normally expect to be rescued by the emergency services during such accidents.

VIEWPOINTS

Bats not a threat to public health, but important for ecosystems

Bats have received a lot of negative attention, but the chances are slim that the virus that causes COVID-19 was transmitted from bats to humans. The world needs bats – in ecosystems, for pollination and for seed dispersal. On top of that, they keep harmful insects in check around our homes, on farms and in cities.

BLOG

Interrupted breathing during sleep – a widespread disease with no cure

Every fifth Norwegian suffers from the widespread disease obstructive sleep apnea. Several treatment options exist, among them surgery, however results are unpredictable and of variable quality and differ from individual to individual. What determines if the treatment is successful or not? Our scientific research using mathematical airflow models may help the medical doctors to find the answer.

WITH VIDEO

A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard

It’s not easy being a tiny willow on the wind-and snow-blasted islands of the Norwegian territory of Svalbard. It turns out that Salix polaris, the polar willow, handles these tough conditions by growing as best it can in response to July temperatures — a response that researchers recorded all over the archipelago.

Researchers find commonalities in all crises

In the aftermath of a crisis, it is always easy to see how the crisis could have been better handled, and then we put new measures into place. But do these measures set us up to solve the next crisis – the one we don’t yet know about?