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Mt Pinatubo erupting in 1991

Blocking the sun to control global warming

It sounds like something out of a bad science fiction movie — artificially blocking sunlight to keep global warming from overheating the Earth. Nevertheless, a small cadre of researchers is studying the option — so that if humankind ever needs to use it, it will be an informed decision.

Gløshaugen
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Which species will be our urban neighbours?

All over the world, people are moving out of rural areas, and cities are growing. What will be the impact on resident species that live in these cities? Which will be our new plant and animal neighbours, which will have to leave town, and what does that mean for us humans?

Major breakthrough in research on decompression sickness

An NTNU researcher has discovered what happens in the genes of divers with decompression sickness. The breakthrough is gaining international attention after more than a century of searching for the causes of divers’ disease.

Researcher demonstrating a new ultrasound device for detecting brain pressure

Measuring brain pressure can become big business

A new invention may be on the verge of replacing a costly cranial surgical procedure currently being performed on some traffic accident victims and other patient groups. The ultrasound-based technology has now been granted CE approval for the European market.

Kids still play like their grandparents did

For generations, children have played blind man’s bluff, hide-and-seek, hopscotch and climbed trees. But in the “olden days,” free play could more often end in injury and death.

Measuring the impact of extreme waves on offshore structures

Strong storms can trigger steep, breaking waves that slam into platforms and wind turbines with tremendous force. Scientists at NTNU and SINTEF are studying the behaviour of offshore structures subjected to these kinds of waves. Their goal is to increase safety at sea.

NICU incubator
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Is it always right to save lives? A radical proposal

In neonatal medicine, there is a grey area where professionals may be uncertain whether it is in the child’s best interests to start life-saving treatment. Without it, the infant dies. But the treatment can also do great harm. One of the foremost duties of medicine is often said to be to “do no harm”. But how much of a burden on the infant is acceptable? At what point is the hope simply too small to justify action?

Entra's office building at Kristian Augusts gate 13
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Building with new thinking and old components

An old building at Tullinløkka in Oslo has set a new standard for reuse, consisting of components from other buildings – like concrete floor dividers from a government building. Building stock in Norway accounts for half of society’s total environmental impact. Thinking in new ways and reusing building components offers multiple gains.

Long-houl shipping at sea

Ammonia – the key to making long-haul shipping green

Relatively simple adaptation could make the cargo ships of the future completely green. The technology is based on the chemical compound ammonia, some extensive number crunching and one or two engine modifications.

Rear view on shirtless back of young male teen with hands on white wall and head down in despair or desperation

Boys’ problems with body size and eating need to be taken seriously

Much more research has been done on eating problems in girls than in boys. There are major differences between the genders when it comes to symptoms and bodies, and the same technique is not as suited to detecting problems in boys, says NTNU researcher Farzaneh Saeedzadeh Sardahaee.

Icebreaker in ice

What kind of sea ice is that? Ask Knut!

A new app under development is using deep learning and artificial intelligence to classify different kinds of sea ice. People snapping photos during Arctic cruises and uploading them to the new app could someday help prevent Titanic -scale disasters.

Corruption almost inevitable in Russian business

Researcher Julia V. Bondeli studied corruption in Russia for five years. She was surprised at the scope of the problem. There are even “fixers” who are contracted to facilitate corrupt exchanges.