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Shedding light on Nature’s tiniest building blocks

These research scientists are studying Nature’s own nanomaterials – applying tools and methods that are normally used for something quite different. Their work has provided us with knowledge that may revolutionise everything from medical treatments to building constructions. 

Glasgow climate talks and the fate of the planet

Just over two months after UN Secretary-General António Guterres described a new climate report on the state of the planet as “code red for humanity”, the nations of the world have the chance to do something about it. But will they?

Is it too late to save the planet?

Code red for humanity, says the IPCC. Fortunately, there’s still a lot we can do, but we have no time to lose, says NTNU climate researcher Edgar Hertwich.

robot in mine tunnel

A $2 million prize for subterranean robots

Team Cerberus has won an international competition with their subterranean robots, competing against top-ranked challengers. The group is headed by an NTNU professor.

A red tree in a black an white photo

Provoking climate engagement

As you walk around the city, nature “pops up” in unexpected places. Like a “lung tree” – a tree that breathes. The Nature in Your Face research project wants to use art to create engagement.

Mt Pinatubo erupting in 1991

Blocking the sun to control global warming

It sounds like something out of a bad science fiction movie — artificially blocking sunlight to keep global warming from overheating the Earth. Nevertheless, a small cadre of researchers is studying the option — so that if humankind ever needs to use it, it will be an informed decision.

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VIEWPOINTS

Which species will be our urban neighbours?

All over the world, people are moving out of rural areas, and cities are growing. What will be the impact on resident species that live in these cities? Which will be our new plant and animal neighbours, which will have to leave town, and what does that mean for us humans?

Major breakthrough in research on decompression sickness

An NTNU researcher has discovered what happens in the genes of divers with decompression sickness. The breakthrough is gaining international attention after more than a century of searching for the causes of divers’ disease.

Researcher demonstrating a new ultrasound device for detecting brain pressure

Measuring brain pressure can become big business

A new invention may be on the verge of replacing a costly cranial surgical procedure currently being performed on some traffic accident victims and other patient groups. The ultrasound-based technology has now been granted CE approval for the European market.

Kids still play like their grandparents did

For generations, children have played blind man’s bluff, hide-and-seek, hopscotch and climbed trees. But in the “olden days,” free play could more often end in injury and death.

Measuring the impact of extreme waves on offshore structures

Strong storms can trigger steep, breaking waves that slam into platforms and wind turbines with tremendous force. Scientists at NTNU and SINTEF are studying the behaviour of offshore structures subjected to these kinds of waves. Their goal is to increase safety at sea.

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BLOG

Is it always right to save lives? A radical proposal

In neonatal medicine, there is a grey area where professionals may be uncertain whether it is in the child’s best interests to start life-saving treatment. Without it, the infant dies. But the treatment can also do great harm. One of the foremost duties of medicine is often said to be to “do no harm”. But how much of a burden on the infant is acceptable? At what point is the hope simply too small to justify action?