Energy and environment

Laste ikon
LOADING CONTENT

Could this dry battery system be Elon Musk’s next big thing?

The idea behind batteries is to make the planet greener, but they all start their lives as energy-demanding environmental liabilities. Research scientists at SINTEF have succeeded in making batteries cheaper and simpler using a process that requires much less energy consumption.

An offshore gas turbine. These can be replaced by fuel cells.

We can electrify the continental shelf without electricity cables

Electrification of the Norwegian continental shelf is a long-standing political issue. Now research scientists believe this can be done using fuel cells installed on the platforms. This will reduce CO2 emissions and remove the need to lay new subsea cables.

VIEWPOINTS

Corrosion forecast technology can cut costs and reduce waste

High energy prices highlight the importance of the thousands of kilometres of insulated pipe networks and equipment in industrial plants. However, corrosion under the pipes’ insulation is hard to detect and can have severe consequences. New surveillance technology being developed by SINTEF can help combat this looming threat.

First ones out to buy and sell neighbourhood electricity

Many buildings with solar cells produce more electricity than they consume themselves, but current legislation prevents surplus power from being sold to neighbouring consumers. A pilot project in Trondheim will be the first in the world to test a system that makes this possible.

Resycling of phosphorous at Hias, Norway

Recovering eco-friendly phosphorous from wastewater

A shortage of phosphorous is driving the price of artificial fertilisers through the roof. But a new and eco-friendly wastewater decontamination process has enabled a company in Hamar in Norway to kill two birds with one stone.

Illustration photo of peacock with feathers out

Nature’s colours can replace toxic pigments

Dye pigments are often toxic, so researchers around the world have long been looking for effective ways to make non-toxic, recyclable and sustainable colours instead. The answer lies in nanotechnology and nature’s own methods.