Humanities

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Provoking climate engagement

As you walk around the city, nature “pops up” in unexpected places. Like a “lung tree” – a tree that breathes. The Nature in Your Face research project wants to use art to create engagement.

An old doctor's mask and a book in a museum
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Quarantine and financial support for plagues were already in place in the 1600s

Plagues have ravaged Norway many times over the centuries. As early as 1625, the state took systematic action to prevent the plague from spreading. Isolation was a new idea that would prove to be effective. Strict restrictions were imposed on social gatherings, including limits on the number of people who could be present at weddings and funerals. Measures were also introduced to compensate the business community for the financial losses resulting from closures.

A young man greetings an old woman through a glass window. Both holding their hands on the window from opposite sides

Coronavirus measures have actually been pretty mild

Norwegians are unspeakably tired of the measures imposed by the country’s Minister of Health, Bent Høie. But historian Erik Opsahl says the measures are mild compared to the old days. Imported infection during pandemics used to be stopped by gunfire.

Reitgjerdet hospital

Less psychiatric coercion in the early 1900s than in the 1970s

It’s easy to believe that society’s treatment of difficult, violent and criminally mentally ill people has become more humane over time. But that’s not the case. How patients at the end of the 19th century actually felt is difficult to say, but they were at least less exposed to mechanical coercion, according to an NTNU historian.

Worker immigrants in a field

Pandemic has revealed our dependence on migrant workers

Food production was quickly declared a socially critical function with the outbreak of the pandemic. The dependence of agricultural and food industry sectors on migrant workers has never been clearer, one researcher says.

An illustration showing Standard Oil as an enormous hostile squid, stretching across the US

The first battle for oil in Norway

The world’s richest man and the world’s largest oil company dominated the petroleum market in Norway long before landmark finds on the Norwegian continental shelf and the Norwegian oil fund.

Interior from the old thermal power laboratory at the Norwegian University of Technology. The picture shows machines and equipment and people at work.

110 years of engineers who built Norway

We often associate innovation with someone who invents something completely new. But innovation is also about improving and expanding on existing technology. One hundred and ten years of Norwegian engineering history provides plenty of examples.

A lady with lots of electrical equipment on her head

Why writing by hand makes kids smarter

New brain research shows that writing by hand helps children learn more and remember better. At the same time, schools are becoming more and more digital, and a European survey shows that Norwegian children spend the most time online of 19 countries in the EU.

Place names describe Scandinavia in the Iron and Viking Ages

Every now and then, researchers are lucky enough to experience a Eureka moment — when a series of facts suddenly crystallize into a an entirely new pattern. That’s exactly what happened to Birgit Maixner from the NTNU University Museum when she began looking at artefacts and place names.

Scandinavians’ little linguistic hat trick

Moving a word to the beginning of a sentence is a useful trick to draw attention to the most important topic you want to relay. The researchers of a new study have found that the Scandinavian languages are unique in their use of this technique.

WITH VIDEO

When art turns climate activist

Can art that literally takes your breath away make you more climate friendly? You can find out yourself if you happen to be in Madrid, at the UN Climate Change Conference, COP 25.

Could a chatbot be your friend or romantic partner?

Researcher Marita Skjuve has been interviewing people who have a close relationship with a chatbot called Replika. Her conclusion is that such relationships offer value and meaning to the chatbot’s users, and can even be romantic.