Fish and aquaculture

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Is there a new deep-sea fishery on the horizon?

Well, some researchers believe this is possible. Species living at depths between 200 and 1000 metres may be very valuable. However, harvesting them isn’t as easy as it might sound because, when taken on board, valuable catches change rapidly from pure gold to ashes.

W. Ludwig Kuhn

Ultrasound can save fish in hydropower rivers

Shooting sound waves through water can remove dissolved gas that results from hydropower production in rivers. This gas can harm fish. Researchers are now ready to test techniques to reduce the risk in real hydropower plants.

Seabed mining

Norway will be the first in the world to approve seabed mining. Is it a good idea?

The transition to a greener, renewable economy will require large amounts of minerals, and society has to get them from somewhere. Norwegian politicians have reached an agreement approving deep sea mining, in a proposal that has reaped both cheers and frustration from scientists and activists alike. Here’s what our scientists think.

Six out of ten are worried that their work is affecting their health

The 1,283 workers in the aquaculture sector who have responded to a recent HSE survey are not anxious without good reason. Sixty-two percent have experienced ‘near misses’ in the last two years. However, there is another threat that is making them even more worried.

Aeromonas. Sushi.

How safe is your sushi?

Bacteria in raw seafood can make you sick. Seafood can also spread bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

WITH PODCAST

Listening to Leviathans

Nineteenth-century Norwegian technology helped bring large whale populations to the brink of extinction. Can 21st-century technology help save them?

VIEWPOINTS

Norway needs a ‘salmon feed revolution’

The issue of salmon feed has become a bottleneck, hindering the growth and sustainability of the Norwegian aquaculture sector. In the future, insect meal, bristle worms and bacteria that consume CO2 may become essential components of a farmed salmon’s diet.

Small snail looking to be big business

Researchers have succeeded in nurturing a small snail called periwinkles in the laboratory for the very first time and are hoping that this French delicacy might be the launch pad for a new, Norwegian aquaculture business.

NOTES

Learning to trace salmon lice

Is it only farmed fish that are responsible for spreading salmon lice larvae? Or is it also possible that wild salmon can infect farmed fish? This is what researchers will be trying to find out.

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Professor wants to involve children in work

“A sense of community between generations will be key to ensuring sustainable coastal communities. The importance of children’s learning through work is underestimated,” says Professor Anne Trine Kjørholt.