Innovation

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Long-houl shipping at sea

Ammonia – the key to making long-haul shipping green

Relatively simple adaptation could make the cargo ships of the future completely green. The technology is based on the chemical compound ammonia, some extensive number crunching and one or two engine modifications.

Icebreaker in ice

What kind of sea ice is that? Ask Knut!

A new app under development is using deep learning and artificial intelligence to classify different kinds of sea ice. People snapping photos during Arctic cruises and uploading them to the new app could someday help prevent Titanic -scale disasters.

Ghostfishing

Combating marine waste and ghost fishing with new materials

Ghost fishing and plastic waste from the fisheries industry is becoming a major environmental problem. Can we address the issue by using degradable plastics? Scientists at a new research centre are aiming to find the answers and develop the systems we need.

 

Thomas Tybell in the lab. Photo: Geir Mogen

Engineering materials for a new generation of electronics

Harnessing a fundamental property of electrons called spin could help create a new generation of computer chips and faster, more stable and less power hungry devices. NTNU researchers are studying a type of material that could make this technology feasible.

Circuit board

Little brain reads 8000 messages per second

Autonomous vehicles are in demand like never before. At NTNU, researchers have developed a circuit board that can be adapted to different drones with simple steps. Airbus has tested the system on a lunar landing prototype.

This is how the new Covid-19 vaccine works

Pfizer has recently announced that it is ready with a Covid-19 vaccine that is 90 percent effective. The vaccine is a so-called mRNA vaccine that has been developed jointly by Pfizer and BioNTech. But what is mRNA technology, and how does it work?

Teaching robots to cooperate underwater

The launch of a new research centre for robotics will provide increased knowledge about the sea with the help of underwater drones and robots. This could impact Norway’s international role as a major power at sea, says centre director.

Interior from the old thermal power laboratory at the Norwegian University of Technology. The picture shows machines and equipment and people at work.

110 years of engineers who built Norway

We often associate innovation with someone who invents something completely new. But innovation is also about improving and expanding on existing technology. One hundred and ten years of Norwegian engineering history provides plenty of examples.

A deep dive into subsea monitoring

The coastline of Norway is peppered with more than a thousand oil wells, most of which will be plugged once they’re no longer profitable. They have to be monitored in case they leak — but keeping an eye on them isn’t easy.  A new company offers a different approach that could help.

Making future transport more climate friendly

The world’s transportation network is constantly growing. “Green asphalt” and sustainable bus transportation will ease the environmental impact of future transport routes.

Putting off old age on the Norwegian shelf

Sand in the oil stream with the risk of well collapse is a well-known problem when sandstone reservoirs approach depletion. Advanced sensors and a super machine are helping research scientists to find the threshold at which profitable production ceases. This can increase the lifetime of reservoirs.