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“Seaweeds may become a profitable piece in the green transition jigsaw”

A unanimous group of research scientists are convinced that kelp may share many of the applications of soya and oil, and that they can also be used to capture CO2. Seaweeds can contribute towards climate-friendly solutions in all sorts of contexts. New know-how about seaweed farming is currently accelerating industrialisation of the sector.

NTNU establishes a factory to produce coronavirus tests

NTNU researchers recently figured out a whole new method for testing people for the coronavirus. The university is now producing tests on a continuous basis, under the auspices of the Norwegian Directorate of Health. Currently 100 000 tests a day are being manufactured, with production soon likely to be scaled up dramatically.

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Mathilde spent four hours in a chamber breathing dust

Road dust can be a big problem in the winter, especially in northern climes where the use of studded tyres is allowed. Researchers are now studying how the type of stone used in asphalt affects the amount and harmfulness of dusty particulate matter that gets kicked up as studded tyres chew into the asphalt.

App for migraines

A daily 10-minute training session using an app could reduce migraine attacks for many sufferers, according to researchers.

Cement factories can put the brakes on global plastic pollution

Researchers believe that plastic refuse can be used as fuel in cement factories in Asia. If this works, it may provide a solution to two of the planet’s biggest environmental problems – plastic in the oceans and high levels of coal consumption.

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Teaching robots to see and feel

Newly developed technology has given robots the ability to learn new skills, enabling them to perform complex tasks and work alongside humans. This innovation can benefit many crucial societal functions, such as food production

Cleaner fish being sacrificed in the fight against salmon lice

Research shows that even fish farmers have doubts as to whether using cleaner fish is an effective delousing method. “Fish farmers tell us that they want a ban on the use of certain species. They’re also very critical of wild-caught cleaner fish being transported,” says researcher Kristine Størkersen. She is one of the scientists who have been helping the Norwegian Food Safety Authority gain an overview of the situation.

From coronavirus to a greener society?

Governments across the globe are funding record-breaking crisis packages to cope with the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Is this the time to fund greener, more climate-friendly industries and investments?

A deep dive into subsea monitoring

The coastline of Norway is peppered with more than a thousand oil wells, most of which will be plugged once they’re no longer profitable. They have to be monitored in case they leak — but keeping an eye on them isn’t easy.  A new company offers a different approach that could help.

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Fast-moving information on a fast-moving virus

Medical researchers worldwide are racing to find treatments and vaccines to combat the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe. A new website offers up-to-date summaries on available and emerging options against COVID-19.

New job in the time of corona?

Now that “everybody” is working from home, it can be challenging for companies to recruit and onboard new employees. How can the new hires be productive and feel that they belong in the workplace when they are working from home? According to scientists, there are good guidelines for dealing with this and therefore no reason to delay action.

How tiny water droplets form can have a big impact on climate models

Droplets and bubbles are formed nearly everywhere, from boiling our morning coffee, to complex industrial processes and even volcanic eruptions. New research from SINTEF and NTNU in Norway, improves our understanding of how these bubbles and droplets form. This could improve our ability to model climate change.

Five tips to alleviate corona anxiety

Restlessness, insomnia, ruminating and aching muscles. Here are one professor’s tips for anyone who is struggling with anxiety and fear due to the coronavirus.

Global supply chains as a way to curb carbon emissions

The coronavirus outbreak raised everyone’s awareness of the significance of global supply chains to modern economies. But global supply chains also play an important role in greenhouse gas emissions. How they are managed can either increase or decrease carbon emissions, new research shows.

Working from home does not make us less productive

Current research into teamwork is showing that we do not become less productive working from home, provided that we work intelligently and are equipped with tools that enable us to work together with our colleagues. In this article, researchers will be advising us not only on what works, but also on what isn’t so smart.

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Game-based learning platform free for the remainder of the school year

Teachers across the globe are working hard to provide classes online for the millions of students who are homebound because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Kahoot, an online interactive learning platform that has its roots in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is offering free premium access to help teachers enrich their online offerings.

Cracking the code to sea cucumber farming

Sea cucumbers are internationally known as a superfood, as they contain many healthy substances. They are highly sought after by both Chinese restaurants and health food manufacturers. However, many sea cucumber species are threatened with extinction, so researchers want to farm them commercially – on land.

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Thinking outside the box of fossils

During the time of Darwin, anthropogeny was the study of human origins. Its sub-discipline paleoanthropology has since taken over, which focuses on fossils found in dry parts of Africa. These fossils don’t tell us much about why or where humans actually evolved.

Place names describe Scandinavia in the Iron and Viking Ages

Every now and then, researchers are lucky enough to experience a Eureka moment — when a series of facts suddenly crystallize into a an entirely new pattern. That’s exactly what happened to Birgit Maixner from the NTNU University Museum when she began looking at artefacts and place names.