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Premature baby in incubator

Being premature can increase your risk of COPD and asthma

“Doctors should look at the length of pregnancy in patients with respiratory problems,” says researcher Kari Risnes. But if you were born before your due date, you can take some measures yourself to prevent lung infections.

Need to know much more about deep sea mining

The Norwegian government has proposed opening an area of the continental shelf to deep sea mining. NTNU researchers have worked for more than a decade on this issue. They say we have much to learn before Norway can decide if this can become a viable industry.

VIEWPOINTS

Cultures of fear can be strangled at birth

In the wake of the shocking revelation from a major Oslo hospital that fear among employees is making corporate whistleblowing difficult, some in the IT sector are promoting the opposite. When something goes wrong, they learn from their mistakes together.

Footballgirls with different skincolours

Is a foreign name a disadvantage?

Do we discriminate against people with foreign-sounding names? A clever experiment with fictional girls who wanted to play football yields some answers that might surprise you.

Ground-breaking knowledge from minute organs grown on microchips

The use of stem cells now makes it possible for us to cultivate so-called organoids, such as tiny versions of a liver, heart or small intestine, in the lab. These micro-organs can then be connected to a microchip that simulates the body’s biological processes. This ‘organ-on-a-chip’ technology opens the door to previously undreamt-of research possibilities.

Sign showing pilgrim's way

Project lures pilgrims beyond well-trodden paths

Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims make use of Europe’s many pilgrimage walks every year. However, travellers tend to visit only a few of the attractions along the routes. The EU project “rurAllure” aims to attract travellers to lesser-known sites of interest.

Locking CO2 captured from seaweed in biocoal

Seaweeds cultivated in the sea off the coast of Trøndelag, Norway will be converted into biocoal and used to improve agricultural land. A new method for carbon capture and storage is now being trialled by Norwegian researchers.

It's 1910 and NTH, the Norwegian Institute of Technology, is officially opening. The hall is full of men, aside from a woman in the back, against the wall.

How chemistry studies became a door opener for women in 1910

The Norwegian Institute of Technology had special status and an education from the institute virtually guaranteed good career opportunities. That allowed its women graduates to break the glass ceiling in the early 20th century and become chemical engineers. But every woman needed a supportive man behind her.