grid cells

How your brain experiences time

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories. The area of the brain where time is experienced is located right next to the area that codes for space.

May-Britt Moser, Johan Magnus Elvemo og Bertil Palma r Johansen diskuterer "My Running Rat". Foto: Idun Haugan, NTNU
WITH VIDEO

Rock-and-roll running rats

Composer Bertil Palmar Johansen calls the rats Gjertrud and Hjørdis “rock-and-roll rats” because they’re so cool. They also star in a new art video about neurological research. The music to the video is built on the sound of brain cell signals from May-Britt Moser’s rats.

Gala dress with grid cell glitter

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: When May-Britt Moser accepts the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her co-laureates Edvard Moser and John O’Keefe, she’ll be wearing a custom-made gala dress created by a designer who until a year ago was a tunnel engineer.

2014 Nobel Prize

Nobel lectures touch on central discoveries and tantalizing findings

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel Laureates and neuroscientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser described how they made their prize-winning discovery in their Nobel lectures on Sunday 7 December. They also gave the audience a tantalizing glimpse into new findings, including the existence of speed cells in the brain, and how odours and memory are linked.

Not exactly popcorn

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: When May-Britt Moser gave her Nobel lecture on Sunday, she had some help from the audience. At her signal Moser’s colleagues stood up in the audience and made popping sounds. These are the sounds that the scientists hear when rat brain cells communicate with each other.

Gertrude, Tarzan, and the rest of the Nobel gang

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Animal welfare is important for Nobel laureates May-Britt and Edvard Moser. Not just because that is how it should be, but also because the researchers get the best results that way.

A village of neuroscientists

2014 NOBEL PRIZE — There’s a proverb – the origins of which are hotly disputed – that says “It takes a village to raise a child.” You could almost say the same thing about groundbreaking discoveries in neuroscience, if NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/Centre for Neural Computation (KI/CNC) is any example.

Hjerneforskerne May-Britt og Edvard Moser.

From bomb shelter beginnings to the Nobel Prize

2014 NOBEL PRIZE — Nearly all innovations have founder myths, like the apocryphal garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak are said to have developed the Apple Computer. But two innovative neuroscientists in Trondheim really did start their research in the university equivalent of a garage – a bomb shelter – and then went on to build a world-class laboratory and win the Nobel Prize.

The many maps of the brain

Your brain has at least four different senses of location – and perhaps as many as 10. And each is different, according to new research from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience.