Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH)

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NTNU’s new COVID-19 test to be used in India and Denmark

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has signed agreements to deliver as many as one million COVID-19 test kits to DTU, the Technical University of Denmark, and APS LABS, an Indian biotech company. “It is very positive that this technology can now also be useful internationally,” says Bent Høie, Norway’s Minister of Health and Care Services.

Ambulance personel treat an unconscious person on the street

Simple nasal spray ready to save lives

Between 250 and 270 people die each year from heroin or opioid overdoses in Norway. In the EU, thousands die. European users now have a better option available for helping each other.

Hope for 500 000 insomniacs in Norway

Digital sleep therapy could offer help to people with sleep problems and enable many of them to reduce their sleep medication after treatment.

A man cycles on a dirt road

Cycling among top causes of concussion

A lot of people struggle with poor memory and impaired attention after a concussion, but how they experience their symptoms differs from their test results.

NTNU establishes a factory to produce coronavirus tests

NTNU researchers recently figured out a whole new method for testing people for the coronavirus. The university is now producing tests on a continuous basis, under the auspices of the Norwegian Directorate of Health. Currently 100 000 tests a day are being manufactured, with production soon likely to be scaled up dramatically.

App for migraines

A daily 10-minute training session using an app could reduce migraine attacks for many sufferers, according to researchers.

Five tips to alleviate corona anxiety

Restlessness, insomnia, ruminating and aching muscles. Here are one professor’s tips for anyone who is struggling with anxiety and fear due to the coronavirus.

Norway’s Nobel laureates take up the fight against Alzheimer’s

Developing an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is the long-term goal of a new national research centre in Norway. Nobel laureates Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser will lead the K. G. Jebsen Centre for Alzheimer’s Disease, aimed at determining how Alzheimer’s disease arises in the brain and its early stages of development.