Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH)

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Can exercise make breast milk better?

Research scientist Trine Moholdt at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has been awarded an ERC Starting Grant from the European Research Council (ERC). She will study how exercise impacts breast milk composition.

Having trouble sleeping? Try exercise!

People in good physical shape are less likely to need a sleeping pill prescription from their doctor. This suggests that being fit can help you sleep better.

Cold shock, weddings and conflicts can trigger temporary amnesia

Over three hundred Norwegians experience temporary memory loss each year, but the cause has until now been difficult to discern with brain scans. A super magnet costing EUR 9.4 million gives hope that more people might be able to find out why they suddenly forgot everything.

Bariatric surgery yields the best results over time

Individuals with severe obesity often reward themselves with food. Recent research shows that dieting is good for changing eating habits and weight. However, bariatric surgery has several advantages.

Patient involvement after acute heart attacks

Minutes count when you have a heart attack. Patient involvement is a statutory right but not always possible in this situation. Elise K. Bårdsgjerde has researched participation in the different phases of the patient process from the perspective of patients, nurses and doctors.

Researchers discover more about what causes atherosclerosis

The underlying cause of many cardiovascular diseases is inflammation of the artery walls. Now NTNU researchers have found that a specific neurotransmitter in the immune cells is a key factor when cholesterol accumulates in our blood vessels.

Could gene therapy soon curb muscle loss in the elderly?

Researchers at NTNU have managed to restore muscle function in older mice with muscle loss using advanced gene therapy. The hope is that this method might eventually be used on humans to prevent severe loss of muscle mass.

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Cognitive impairment afflicts majority of stroke patients

More than half of the individuals who suffer a stroke subsequently struggle with concentration and problem solving. Cognitive impairment following a stroke doesn’t go away. The problem has been overlooked, according to a major research project.

We move along the surface of a doughnut

Researchers have gained a first insight into how the brain structures higher-level information. By extracting and analysing data from a neural network of grid cells, they found that the collective neural activity is shaped like the surface of a doughnut. The study, from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and collaborators, is published in Nature.