Innovation

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Microscopic sensor for more precise radiology treatments

A team of Norwegian, French and Australian researchers is the first in the world to succeed in quantifying the effects of radiation on individual cancer cells. This means that radiation therapies can now be tailored to individual tumours and thus be more effective.

WITH VIDEO

Five Nordic universities look into the crystal ball

The Nordic Five Tech, an alliance of the leading technical universities in the Nordic countries, celebrated its tenth anniversary this June with a high level summit to plot a strategy for its next decade. There was talk of horses, cars, and swimming robot snakes.

WITH VIDEO

Japan-Norway Arctic Science and Innovation Week

Representatives from Japanese and Norwegian universities, research institutions, government agencies and industries interested in polar issues will gather in Tokyo in early June to present research results and build partnerships.

Hacking Trondheim to cut greenhouse gas emissions

NTNU and Norway’s technological capital—Trondheim—hosted a Climathon to give the city the tools it needs to make ambitious greenhouse gas cuts. The results might be helpful to other cities around the globe that face the same problem.

The professor who misses his tail

Professor Dag Svanæs has lectured at Stanford University and is inspired by the philosophers Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. He has also had a furry mechanized tail that he still sometimes misses.

Norwegian agri-tech goes global

Norwegian manufacturers of agricultural technology are now getting active support from researchers. Such companies will benefit from new applications and exposure to a global market.

The Towing Tank turns 75

NTH, Norway’s first technical university and one of the main predecessors to NTNU, SINTEF and MARINTEK, opened in Trondheim in 1910. Just three years later its scientists began to think very big – 170 metres big.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Mining ocean treasures

Underwater mining is a growing industry. Norway might be mining gold from 2000 metres below sea level in just a few years.