Successful utilisation of every single gramme of fish

The rest raw materials left after a salmon has been filleted are equivalent to more than 60 percent of its slaughtered weight. It will soon be possible to convert these into a high-quality fish oil, taste-neutral fish proteins, fish gelatin and flame-retardant materials. Ensuring that not a single gramme goes to waste.

Mann i hvit frakk sitter på laboratorium der han ser på solcelle han holder i hendene.

Searching for the secret to more efficient solar cells

The search for the perfect solar cell is not yet over. Norwegian researchers are now adopting a new approach to the cells’ raw material, crystalline silicon, with the aim of making the electricity-generating cells even more efficient.

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Teaching robots to see and feel

Newly developed technology has given robots the ability to learn new skills, enabling them to perform complex tasks and work alongside humans. This innovation can benefit many crucial societal functions, such as food production

Cracking the code to sea cucumber farming

Sea cucumbers are internationally known as a superfood, as they contain many healthy substances. They are highly sought after by both Chinese restaurants and health food manufacturers. However, many sea cucumber species are threatened with extinction, so researchers want to farm them commercially – on land.

A new thermal insulation bag will save lives

It is very likely that the human body develop hypothermia following an accident. Maintaining a patient’s body temperature on the way to hospital can be crucial to survival. The prototype of a new and improved solution is now ready.

What young people ask about when guaranteed anonymity

An analysis of almost 300,000 unsolicited questions written by young Norwegians on the website ung.no, has provided major insights into what they’re really interested in today. Their bodies, health and identity are among the topics heading the list.

Making it easier to capture CO2 in the cement industry

Cement manufacture accounts for as much as seven per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. A new hybrid technology makes it easier and less expensive to capture and purify CO2 produced by the industry. And the technology can be retrofitted to existing plants.

A diagnostic tool to save lives and prevent brain damage

A new study confirms the efficacy of a new diagnostic tool that utilises ultrasound to measure intracranial pressure following accidents. The technology will now be provided with artificial intelligence so that ambulance personnel can carry out examinations at accident scenes.

New filter removes run-off chemicals

The filter will first be used to recover aircraft de-icing chemicals. In the future it will also be used in urban areas to remove environmental toxins, pollution and probably microplastics.

Our cities are hidden power stations

Waste heat and locally-produced renewable energy can be generated by compact, “urban power plants” that are efficient enough to supply heat to entire housing estates.

A future for skiing in a warmer world

As the world struggles to make progress to limit climate change, researchers are finding ways to adapt to warmer winter temperatures — by developing environmentally friendly ways of producing artificial snow.

Speed warning system saves lives and reduces emissions

Universal adoption of the ISA speed warning system in Norway could reduce both the average speed of vehicles and their emissions, concludes a recent SINTEF report. Lower speeds also lead to fewer fatalities and serious injuries on the roads.

Crushed aggregates provide major environmental benefits

Norwegian cities are expanding very rapidly and in the areas surrounding many of them, naturally-occurring aggregates for asphalt and concrete production are becoming scarce. The solution may lie in local rock outcrops.

Eco-cement from Norwegian clay

Blue clay from Norway is emerging as a climate-friendly alternative to cements used to make concrete – turning a waste material into a resource.