Hydrogen production and carbon capture – in a single step

A team of Norwegian researchers has succeeded in producing hydrogen using a far more efficient method than is currently in use. The technology was ready as early as in 2017. The team has also demonstrated that the process can be scaled up for commercial application.

Depression, illustrational photo shows a depressed younger boy.

Hope for children at risk of relapse in depression

Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in adolescence and is found in children as young as kindergarten age. Unfortunately, the disorder often lasts into adulthood, but an NTNU study gives cause for optimism.

New treatment leads to much less overeating

Patients with morbid obesity experienced improvement in their quality of life and distinctly fewer episodes of overeating after ten weeks with a new treatment method developed at NTNU.

illustration photo, pregnant woman lying in bed. Photo:colourbox

Immune system can detect disease during pregnancy

Researchers at NTNU have surveyed how a mother’s immune system changes during the course of pregnancy. This knowledge can help detect disease and complications, and give the foetus a better start in life.

Is it too late to save the planet?

Code red for humanity, says the IPCC. Fortunately, there’s still a lot we can do, but we have no time to lose, says NTNU climate researcher Edgar Hertwich.

nyfødt barn

Preemies at greater risk for mortality in adulthood

The risk of dying from heart disease, chronic lung disease or diabetes in adulthood is twice as high for preemies —premature infants — as for the general population. Even those who were born just two to three weeks before term have a slightly increased risk.

Reitgjerdet hospital

Less psychiatric coercion in the early 1900s than in the 1970s

It’s easy to believe that society’s treatment of difficult, violent and criminally mentally ill people has become more humane over time. But that’s not the case. How patients at the end of the 19th century actually felt is difficult to say, but they were at least less exposed to mechanical coercion, according to an NTNU historian.

Worker immigrants in a field

Pandemic has revealed our dependence on migrant workers

Food production was quickly declared a socially critical function with the outbreak of the pandemic. The dependence of agricultural and food industry sectors on migrant workers has never been clearer, one researcher says.

A man with bionic legs, doing push-ups

Mimicking effect of exercise with gene therapy

Gene therapy is the most effective method to be able to provide health benefits you normally gain through physical exercise. This means of “training” could be helpful for folks who can’t exercise in the usual ways.

App for migraines

A daily 10-minute training session using an app could reduce migraine attacks for many sufferers, according to researchers.

Proteins in blood test can reveal and predict disease

An analysis of 5 000 proteins from a blood sample is providing valuable information on a variety of diseases we might get or be at risk for. “Sensational” is the word from Christian Jonasson at the HUNT Research Centre about the US-British-Norwegian study.

Scandinavians’ little linguistic hat trick

Moving a word to the beginning of a sentence is a useful trick to draw attention to the most important topic you want to relay. The researchers of a new study have found that the Scandinavian languages are unique in their use of this technique.

Computer video simulation can limit flooding

Floods are expensive and at times dangerous. But what if a computer disaster simulation game could show politicians and local people what potential floods in their town would look like?

Building computers the way our brains work

We are approaching the limit for how much more microprocessors can be developed. Gunnar Tufte proposes building computers in a completely new way, inspired by the human brain and nanotechnology.