Information Technology and Electrical Engineering (IE)

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A $2 million prize for subterranean robots

Team Cerberus has won an international competition with their subterranean robots, competing against top-ranked challengers. The group is headed by an NTNU professor.

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A robotic microplankton sniffer dog

The microscopic, free-floating algae called phytoplankton — and the tiny zooplankton that eat them — are notoriously difficult to count. Researchers need to know how a warming climate will affect them both. A new kind of smart, lightweight autonomous underwater vehicle (LAUV) can help.

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Making sure ships, other marine craft find their way

If you’ve ever wondered about the importance of shipping and navigation, think back to the grounding of the Ever Given container ship in the Suez Canal in March this year. The ship, stuck fast for six days, crippled shipping worldwide at the costs of billions of US dollars. A new edition of a popular textbook looks at marine guidance, navigation and control.

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From programming a calculator to activist professor for gender equality

Letizia Jaccheri has won a Norwegian award recognizing her efforts to bring more women into the tech industry. She’s been instrumental in helping increase the number of women in leadership positions at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), where she herself is a professor of computer science.

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Taking control of unmanned vessels at sea

What’s needed to be able to safely send a vessel to sea with no crew? How will these vessels detect a kayaker or a recreational boat that drifts into the course of the unmanned vessel? A new Centre for Research-Based Innovation, SFI AutoShip, will look for answers to these questions – and more.

Thomas Tybell in the lab. Photo: Geir Mogen

Engineering materials for a new generation of electronics

Harnessing a fundamental property of electrons called spin could help create a new generation of computer chips and faster, more stable and less power hungry devices. NTNU researchers are studying a type of material that could make this technology feasible.

Circuit board

Little brain reads 8000 messages per second

Autonomous vehicles are in demand like never before. At NTNU, researchers have developed a circuit board that can be adapted to different drones with simple steps. Airbus has tested the system on a lunar landing prototype.

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Game-based learning platform free for the remainder of the school year

Teachers across the globe are working hard to provide classes online for the millions of students who are homebound because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Kahoot, an online interactive learning platform that has its roots in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is offering free premium access to help teachers enrich their online offerings.

Building computers the way our brains work

We are approaching the limit for how much more microprocessors can be developed. Gunnar Tufte proposes building computers in a completely new way, inspired by the human brain and nanotechnology.