Information Technology and Electrical Engineering (IE)

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Game-based learning platform free for the remainder of the school year

Teachers across the globe are working hard to provide classes online for the millions of students who are homebound because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Kahoot, an online interactive learning platform that has its roots in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is offering free premium access to help teachers enrich their online offerings.

Building computers the way our brains work

We are approaching the limit for how much more microprocessors can be developed. Gunnar Tufte proposes building computers in a completely new way, inspired by the human brain and nanotechnology.

New nanomaterial to replace mercury

Ultraviolet light is used to kill bacteria and viruses, but UV lamps contain toxic mercury. A newly developed nanomaterial is changing that.

New drones check ships for cracks and rust

Inspecting ship tanks and storage spaces underwater is a challenging task for humans. A start-up company that originated at NTNU is manufacturing autonomous drones that can take over the job – and do it more cheaply.

WITH VIDEO

Tourism, aquaculture and offshore accidents with Blueye

Blueye is an underwater drone that got its start at NTNU. The drone can be used for serious purposes – such as when it mapped damage to the Norwegian frigate Helge Ingstad – or for entertainment, such as showing cruise passengers the underwater landscape.

Ocean life in 3-D: Mapping phytoplankton with a smart AUV

Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain but are notoriously difficult for scientists to account for — a little like trying to identify and count motes of dust in the air. A truly independent underwater vehicle shows it can do the job.

Making artificial intelligence understandable for the rest of us

Humans have developed machines that can learn on their own. Machines using artificial intelligence develop “behaviours” based on their interpretation of data. But we know less about how they teach themselves. Professor Harald Martens has created the start-up company Idletechs to develop a technology that will make artificial intelligence more understandable for the rest of us.