Information Technology and Electrical Engineering (IE)

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Super quick COVID test uses new technology

The ability of gold particles to reflect light in different colours is used in applications from stained glass to pregnancy tests. Now researchers are set to exploit the same properties in an ultra-fast sensor for the coronavirus.

fibre-optic Icebreaking Vessel In Arctic at sunset

Eavesdropping on the Earth itself

This summer, a coalition of researchers led by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology reported the first-ever use of a fibre-optic cable network to eavesdrop on whales in the Arctic. Now they suggest these networks be used to establish a low-cost global ocean-earth observatory.

Lots to learn from the Norwegian Public Sector’s IT success

There’s been no lack of scandals in the IT industry. When NAV, the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration, experienced difficulties in the middle of a major project, they changed their methods – and came up with a successful solution.

BitPets get you out for a walk

Are you getting fat from playing way too many computer games? If so, we have good news for you. The game of BitPet requires you to move around in order to do well.

Miniscule signals can prevent major accidents

By listening to electric machines’ magnetic fields, faults can be detected that could prevent potential disasters with electric vehicles. The new method could also save power producers large sums of money.

Photo of self-propelled ferry.

NTNU trials world’s first urban autonomous passenger ferry

In earlier times, cities like Trondheim and Bergen had a ferryman who rowed people from place to place. They were the taxi drivers of the waterways. Now, a new, future-oriented form of water transport will be available to the public.

Algorithms can prevent online abuse

The number of abuse cases against children via the internet has increased by almost 50 per cent in five years, according to the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Researchers at NTNU in Gjøvik have developed algorithms that can help detect planned online grooming by analysing conversations.

Eavesdropping on whales in the high Arctic

The Earth’s oceans are crisscrossed with roughly 1.2 million km of fibre optic telecommunication cables — enough to girdle the planet 30 times. Researchers have now succeeded in using fibre in a submarine cable as a passive listening system, enabling them to listen to and monitor whales.

First ones out to buy and sell neighbourhood electricity

Many buildings with solar cells produce more electricity than they consume themselves, but current legislation prevents surplus power from being sold to neighbouring consumers. A pilot project in Trondheim will be the first in the world to test a system that makes this possible.

students at national cyber range

NTNU has a training arena for handling cyber attacks

Unauthorized people who break into an organization’s computer system can create a serious crisis. It’s critical that businesses, organizations and governments practise for possible attacks. The Norwegian Cyber Range at NTNU offers full-scale simulations of handling cyber and information security incidents.

We move along the surface of a doughnut

Researchers have gained a first insight into how the brain structures higher-level information. By extracting and analysing data from a neural network of grid cells, they found that the collective neural activity is shaped like the surface of a doughnut. The study, from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and collaborators, is published in Nature.

Snake robot turned movie hero

In the new Norwegian-produced disaster film North Sea, the snake robot Eelume plays a crucial role. Norwegian researchers and a Norwegian company are behind the newly released film.

robot in mine tunnel

A $2 million prize for subterranean robots

Team Cerberus has won an international competition with their subterranean robots, competing against top-ranked challengers. The group is headed by an NTNU professor.

WITH VIDEO

A robotic microplankton sniffer dog

The microscopic, free-floating algae called phytoplankton — and the tiny zooplankton that eat them — are notoriously difficult to count. Researchers need to know how a warming climate will affect them both. A new kind of smart, lightweight autonomous underwater vehicle (LAUV) can help.