Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience

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We move along the surface of a doughnut

Researchers have gained a first insight into how the brain structures higher-level information. By extracting and analysing data from a neural network of grid cells, they found that the collective neural activity is shaped like the surface of a doughnut. The study, from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and collaborators, is published in Nature.

DeepMReye: an AI that reads your eyes

You may think that they’re random movements, but they’re not: The way you use your eyes when perceiving the world around you reveals something significant about you and how you engage with the world. It can even be a diagnostic of brain disease.

Dan Moran and Richard Wood from the Industrial Ecology Programme
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NTNU researchers among the world’s most highly cited

The 2020 ISI/Web of Science Highly Cited Researchers list includes seven researchers affiliated with NTNU. The list includes authors who have multiple articles ranked in the top 1 per cent by citation in their field over the last decade.

Norway’s Nobel laureates take up the fight against Alzheimer’s

Developing an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is the long-term goal of a new national research centre in Norway. Nobel laureates Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser will lead the K. G. Jebsen Centre for Alzheimer’s Disease, aimed at determining how Alzheimer’s disease arises in the brain and its early stages of development.

How your brain experiences time

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories. The area of the brain where time is experienced is located right next to the area that codes for space.