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Is there a new deep-sea fishery on the horizon?

Well, some researchers believe this is possible. Species living at depths between 200 and 1000 metres may be very valuable. However, harvesting them isn’t as easy as it might sound because, when taken on board, valuable catches change rapidly from pure gold to ashes.

Six out of ten are worried that their work is affecting their health

The 1,283 workers in the aquaculture sector who have responded to a recent HSE survey are not anxious without good reason. Sixty-two percent have experienced ‘near misses’ in the last two years. However, there is another threat that is making them even more worried.

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Making seaweed cultivation into a major industry

Seaweeds can be used to improve soils and for the biological capture and storage of carbon. They can serve as feed for livestock and as a food and health supplement for humans. And that’s just for starters. A new research project is aiming to help upgrade current cultivation systems to an industrial scale.

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Norway needs a ‘salmon feed revolution’

The issue of salmon feed has become a bottleneck, hindering the growth and sustainability of the Norwegian aquaculture sector. In the future, insect meal, bristle worms and bacteria that consume CO2 may become essential components of a farmed salmon’s diet.

Small snail looking to be big business

Researchers have succeeded in nurturing a small snail called periwinkles in the laboratory for the very first time and are hoping that this French delicacy might be the launch pad for a new, Norwegian aquaculture business.

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Learning to trace salmon lice

Is it only farmed fish that are responsible for spreading salmon lice larvae? Or is it also possible that wild salmon can infect farmed fish? This is what researchers will be trying to find out.

Locking CO2 captured from seaweed in biocoal

Seaweeds cultivated in the sea off the coast of Trøndelag, Norway will be converted into biocoal and used to improve agricultural land. A new method for carbon capture and storage is now being trialled by Norwegian researchers.

Digital twins offer us access to new knowledge

Now, in 2023, there are almost no limits to how much data we can collect and store away. But what can we use all this information for, and how do we find out what the data can tell us?