Medical technology

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Demonstration of echocardiography and AI tool

Peering into your heart – with the help of AI

Portable ultrasound devices can bring high technology imaging to your doctor’s office, to emergency vehicles, and to lesser-developed countries. A new AI tool helps make these devices easier for a wider range of health professionals to use.

Ground-breaking knowledge from minute organs grown on microchips

The use of stem cells now makes it possible for us to cultivate so-called organoids, such as tiny versions of a liver, heart or small intestine, in the lab. These micro-organs can then be connected to a microchip that simulates the body’s biological processes. This ‘organ-on-a-chip’ technology opens the door to previously undreamt-of research possibilities.

Treating patients ‘in hospital’ – even from far away

Imagine being treated ‘in hospital’ via an advanced VR headset! Researchers are now making this possible with the help of local ‘health rooms’ and so-called ‘augmented reality’. Results from their experiments have so far proved to be quite promising.

DeepMReye: an AI that reads your eyes

You may think that they’re random movements, but they’re not: The way you use your eyes when perceiving the world around you reveals something significant about you and how you engage with the world. It can even be a diagnostic of brain disease.

Shedding light on Nature’s tiniest building blocks

These research scientists are studying Nature’s own nanomaterials – applying tools and methods that are normally used for something quite different. Their work has provided us with knowledge that may revolutionise everything from medical treatments to building constructions. 

Researcher demonstrating a new ultrasound device for detecting brain pressure

Measuring brain pressure can become big business

A new invention may be on the verge of replacing a costly cranial surgical procedure currently being performed on some traffic accident victims and other patient groups. The ultrasound-based technology has now been granted CE approval for the European market.

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Twenty years of sequencing genes… for better or for worse

It’s been 20 years since the first draft sequence of the human genome was published in the journals Nature and Science. The result led then-President Bill Clinton to state that we are now learning the language in which life was written, and that “doctors will increasingly be able to cure diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, diabetes, and cancer by attacking their genetic roots.”
Sequencing 30 000 genes has changed the world, but in a different way than expected.

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New NTNU method for beating back the coronavirus

NTNU researchers have started testing a COVID-19 test strategy developed in house: saliva samples you take yourself, without involving health personnel. This means that researchers may be able to knock back the coronavirus epidemic faster, more easily and much more cheaply than today. The method is now being tested on NTNU students.