Medical technology

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DeepMReye: an AI that reads your eyes

You may think that they’re random movements, but they’re not: The way you use your eyes when perceiving the world around you reveals something significant about you and how you engage with the world. It can even be a diagnostic of brain disease.

Shedding light on Nature’s tiniest building blocks

These research scientists are studying Nature’s own nanomaterials – applying tools and methods that are normally used for something quite different. Their work has provided us with knowledge that may revolutionise everything from medical treatments to building constructions. 

Researcher demonstrating a new ultrasound device for detecting brain pressure

Measuring brain pressure can become big business

A new invention may be on the verge of replacing a costly cranial surgical procedure currently being performed on some traffic accident victims and other patient groups. The ultrasound-based technology has now been granted CE approval for the European market.

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Twenty years of sequencing genes… for better or for worse

It’s been 20 years since the first draft sequence of the human genome was published in the journals Nature and Science. The result led then-President Bill Clinton to state that we are now learning the language in which life was written, and that “doctors will increasingly be able to cure diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, diabetes, and cancer by attacking their genetic roots.”
Sequencing 30 000 genes has changed the world, but in a different way than expected.

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New NTNU method for beating back the coronavirus

NTNU researchers have started testing a COVID-19 test strategy developed in house: saliva samples you take yourself, without involving health personnel. This means that researchers may be able to knock back the coronavirus epidemic faster, more easily and much more cheaply than today. The method is now being tested on NTNU students.

NTNU’s new COVID-19 test to be used in India and Denmark

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has signed agreements to deliver as many as one million COVID-19 test kits to DTU, the Technical University of Denmark, and APS LABS, an Indian biotech company. “It is very positive that this technology can now also be useful internationally,” says Bent Høie, Norway’s Minister of Health and Care Services.

NTNU establishes a factory to produce coronavirus tests

NTNU researchers recently figured out a whole new method for testing people for the coronavirus. The university is now producing tests on a continuous basis, under the auspices of the Norwegian Directorate of Health. Currently 100 000 tests a day are being manufactured, with production soon likely to be scaled up dramatically.

App for migraines

A daily 10-minute training session using an app could reduce migraine attacks for many sufferers, according to researchers.

Proteins in blood test can reveal and predict disease

An analysis of 5 000 proteins from a blood sample is providing valuable information on a variety of diseases we might get or be at risk for. “Sensational” is the word from Christian Jonasson at the HUNT Research Centre about the US-British-Norwegian study.

Cholesterol crystals play an active role in stroke, heart attacks

Cholesterol crystals form from “bad” cholesterol and are found in plaques that line blood vessels. When these plaques rupture, they can cause heart attacks or strokes. New research suggests that cholesterol crystals in plaques can actually trigger strokes and heart attacks.

Sound waves for your health

You may not be able to hear them, but they help to diagnose and treat patients every day. In the past 40 years, ultrasound imaging has gone from blurry black-and-white images, to sharp 3D images in real time. And the technology is still developing. Now, artificial intelligence is being tested for aid in interpreting ultrasound images.

Pocket devices a big help to ADHD kids

For children who need help from so-called welfare technology in order to manage their day-to-day lives, it is important that the assistance they get is invisible to others. Many obtain effective help from an app installed on their phones.