Nutrition and lifestyle

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The magic behind the medals

The most successful winter Olympian ever opened nearly two decades of training logs to researchers to shed light on how she achieved her goals. Now researchers have looked at two methods she used for her high-intensity training sessions to see how they compare.

What makes everyone sick?

The world’s best-known doctor is coming to the Big Challenge to talk about the world’s biggest challenge, and one that thousands of scientists are trying to figure out: what makes us sick? Norway is among the challenge participants.

Atrial fibrillation affected by your genes

Researchers have observed a connection between certain genes and atrial fibrillation. Their study makes an important contribution to understanding different risk factors.

Bigger people will need more food

Food demand is growing as people get bigger. Feeding a population of 9 billion in 2050 will require much more food than previously calculated.

Are smoking genes to blame for drinking, too?

Some smokers have genes that predispose them to heavier smoking. Researchers looked at whether those same genes might trigger heavier drinking — and it turns out, they don’t.

Does weather influence older adults’ physical activity?

The summer of 2018 has been one of the hottest and driest in recent times in large parts of Norway and Europe. How does weather affect the exercise habits of the elderly? A study of 1200 older adults’ activity level linked to weather data shows that warmer, dry weather is the most inviting.

Vitamin D deficiency affects many pregnant women

Only one in five women follows the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. Vitamin D deficiency can have serious repercussions for the skeletal health of both mother and child.

Who in Europe drinks the most?

For the first time, researchers have found a way to compare how much alcohol Europeans drink. And Britain, Ireland and Portugal top off the list.

Eight a day is clearly best for your heart

You’ve heard it a thousand times, that little catchphrase with the magic number encouraging you to eat “five a day” of fruits and vegetables for better health. But it turns out that the real magic number is eight, according to a new comprehensive study just published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.