Health

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A diagnostic tool to save lives and prevent brain damage

A new study confirms the efficacy of a new diagnostic tool that utilises ultrasound to measure intracranial pressure following accidents. The technology will now be provided with artificial intelligence so that ambulance personnel can carry out examinations at accident scenes.

Are smoking genes to blame for drinking, too?

Some smokers have genes that predispose them to heavier smoking. Researchers looked at whether those same genes might trigger heavier drinking — and it turns out, they don’t.

Does weather influence older adults’ physical activity?

The summer of 2018 has been one of the hottest and driest in recent times in large parts of Norway and Europe. How does weather affect the exercise habits of the elderly? A study of 1200 older adults’ activity level linked to weather data shows that warmer, dry weather is the most inviting.

How your brain experiences time

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories. The area of the brain where time is experienced is located right next to the area that codes for space.

Researchers make mini-brains from skin

By reprogramming skin cells to become brain cells, researchers have managed to cultivate lots of mini human brains. Some of them have begun to grow pupils for eyes. The technique helps researchers study the most minute details of the genetics of turning stem cells into other cells.

Four World Cup gold medals — and a baby

Marit Bjørgen was a world-class athlete at the top of her career — and then she decided to have a baby. How did that change her ability to train — and her performance afterwards?

Vitamin D deficiency affects many pregnant women

Only one in five women follows the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. Vitamin D deficiency can have serious repercussions for the skeletal health of both mother and child.

Fewer headaches as you age

That midlife crisis in your 40s actually comes with some benefits. Fewer headaches are one of them.

Norwegian family’s medical mystery solved

Back in the 1970s, a Norwegian family was found to have abnormally high red blood cell counts. Thirty-five years later, researchers succeeded in solving the mystery, thanks to new analytical methods and the latest developments in genetic engineering – and a chance meeting with a Swiss scientist.

Are you at risk for lung cancer?

No, this question isn’t only for people who’ve smoked a lot. Seven factors, including two new ones, can predict whether you have a high risk of developing lung cancer.

Exploring new uses for existing antiviral drugs

Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs work against a range of viral diseases, but developing them can be costly and time consuming. Testing existing anti-viral drugs for their ability to combat multiple viral infections can help.

Not easy finding dust masks suitable for women

The smelting industry needs to promote the availability of dust masks of more than one size, according to the research scientists behind a recent working environment study at Norwegian smelting plants.

First aid training for young children

The aim of the national campaign “Sammen redder vi liv” (Saving lives together) is to encourage Norwegians to save more lives. Children are included, and researchers have been given the job of ensuring that it succeeds.