Health

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Premature babies may grow up to have weaker bones

Low birth weight babies are at higher risk of osteoporosis later in life, especially if they are born prematurely. Targeting these children with the appropriate diet and weight-bearing exercise can help improve the problem.

WITH VIDEO

Food waste recycling not always the best idea

With Norway as a case study, a first-ever effort to quantify the benefits of recycling food waste versus preventing it shows prevention is the best policy. But Norway continues to invest significant funds in biogas facilities for food waste recycling.

Andelen barn med eksem har skutt i været siden 1960-tallet i industrialiserte land. For å forebygge barneeksem, viser studier at mors inntak av Biola er effektivt. Foto: Thinkstock

Cultured milk for mom prevents eczema in kids

A daily glass of the cultured milk product called Biola for mom while she is pregnant, and during the first months of breastfeeding helps prevent eczema in children up to the age of six.

Mirror, mirror, will I have a heart attack?

A new smart mirror containing technology developed by NTNU researchers uses 3D-scanners and cameras to make measurements while you brush your teeth, giving you answers about your health minutes later.

ABC — anything but coal

Policymakers, industry and government officials will have to invest US $2.5 trillion for electricity generation over the next 20 years. A new report presents the environmental costs and benefits linked to different renewable energy sources, and makes one thing abundantly clear: anything is better than coal.

Finding a good home for dementia sufferers

Norway is evaluating innovative housing options for dementia sufferers. Perhaps small serviced housing projects and dementia ‘villages’ will provide a more normal life than nursing homes and institutions?

Users to fine-tune hearing aids themselves

More than 20 per cent of people with hearing aids use their devices for less than one hour a day because of problems they encounter with tuning the settings. But now users can participate in fine-tuning their devices themselves.

CF-sufferers getting help from an app

People suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) are unable to absorb sufficient fats and proteins from the food they eat. But an app is on the way that will help them control their illness.

Norwegian Christmas food spills its beans

During Christmas you may begin to wonder if the patties really contain pork, the herring in the tomato sauce really is herring, if the sausages contain beef, or if the Christmas anchovies have anchovies in them. No need to fret, DNA barcoding can confirm the identity of what you’re eating this Christmas.

Many memories, many rooms

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: The brain has an enormous capacity to store memories and to keep memories from getting mixed up in part because of how these memories are stored in the hippocampus, researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have shown.

2014 Nobel Prize

Nobel lectures touch on central discoveries and tantalizing findings

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel Laureates and neuroscientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser described how they made their prize-winning discovery in their Nobel lectures on Sunday 7 December. They also gave the audience a tantalizing glimpse into new findings, including the existence of speed cells in the brain, and how odours and memory are linked.

A “wow” ending of fog, jazz poetry and a tuba

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Edvard and May-Britt Moser finished their Nobel lecture with a music video where NTNU music professors improvised over a Norwegian folk tune. The video was filmed in a dense fog where viewers see the faces of the musicians as they play.

The Nobel Dance

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel laureate and NTNU Professor May-Britt Moser was full of joy when she learned she had won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her husband, Edvard Moser, and their former mentor, John O’Keefe.

Hjerneforskerne May-Britt og Edvard Moser.

From bomb shelter beginnings to the Nobel Prize

2014 NOBEL PRIZE — Nearly all innovations have founder myths, like the apocryphal garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak are said to have developed the Apple Computer. But two innovative neuroscientists in Trondheim really did start their research in the university equivalent of a garage – a bomb shelter – and then went on to build a world-class laboratory and win the Nobel Prize.

Low-carbon electricity future is clean and feasible

The countries of the world wrapped up preliminary climate talks in Lima, Peru this weekend with an agreement on how the UN’s 194 countries will tackle climate change. The agreement comes in advance of major negotiations scheduled for Paris next year to designed to curb the world’s production of greenhouse gases. In a publication from earlier this year, researchers at NTNU’s Industrial Ecology Programme report that the low-carbon future that would result from curbing greenhouse gas emissions is both feasible from a practical standpoint, and will also substantially reduce air pollution.

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly effects on the Sierra Leonean healthcare community not only has repercussions for the delivery of health care now, but on the training of future health care providers involved in an innovative Norwegian surgical training programme.