Public health

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New mechanism allows the immune system to detect and respond to HIV

Nearly 40 million people were living with HIV in 2017, the UN says, with just over half taking antiretroviral therapy. These drugs have cut AIDS-related deaths by more than half since the 2004 peak, but the disease cannot be cured. A new mechanism uncovered by a Norwegian research group could improve the chances of developing one.

What young people ask about when guaranteed anonymity

An analysis of almost 300,000 unsolicited questions written by young Norwegians on the website ung.no, has provided major insights into what they’re really interested in today. Their bodies, health and identity are among the topics heading the list.

People who need health care advice the most like it the least

Most people think it’s a good thing that public health authorities propose preventive health measures. The greatest resistance is found among individuals who need these measures the most – such as smokers, people with unhealthy diets or who don’t exercise.

Botox blocks out facial pain

Patients with chronic facial pain get their teeth pulled, take a bunch of painkillers and are on a perpetual trek between health services – without finding anything that works to ease the pain. An NTNU researcher thinks Botox can help.

Exposing bad science in medical research publishing

Some medical research data never get published because they don’t fit in with the pharmaceutical industry’s desired results. Profiled researcher and social commentator Ben Goldacre will shed some light on this very topic when he takes part in NTNU’s The Big Challenge science festival in Trondheim in June.

What makes everyone sick?

The world’s best-known doctor is coming to the Big Challenge to talk about the world’s biggest challenge, and one that thousands of scientists are trying to figure out: what makes us sick? Norway is among the challenge participants.

Atrial fibrillation affected by your genes

Researchers have observed a connection between certain genes and atrial fibrillation. Their study makes an important contribution to understanding different risk factors.

Are smoking genes to blame for drinking, too?

Some smokers have genes that predispose them to heavier smoking. Researchers looked at whether those same genes might trigger heavier drinking — and it turns out, they don’t.

Vitamin D deficiency affects many pregnant women

Only one in five women follows the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. Vitamin D deficiency can have serious repercussions for the skeletal health of both mother and child.

Are you at risk for lung cancer?

No, this question isn’t only for people who’ve smoked a lot. Seven factors, including two new ones, can predict whether you have a high risk of developing lung cancer.

First aid training for young children

The aim of the national campaign “Sammen redder vi liv” (Saving lives together) is to encourage Norwegians to save more lives. Children are included, and researchers have been given the job of ensuring that it succeeds.

Downsizing can be bad for your health

Organizational downsizing and job loss greatly increase a person’s risk of having to start different medications. Prescriptions for drugs to treat mental health issues are particularly widespread in this group.

Skill building the right way

Now we know more about how to get really good at something. This is especially useful for people who are engaged in helping others to develop skills and knowledge — and for parents.

Possible treatment for deadly weight loss

Many cancer patients are susceptible to potentially lethal weight loss. Now researchers understand better why this happens, and perhaps how to prevent the condition.