Art

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When art turns climate activist

Can art that literally takes your breath away make you more climate friendly? You can find out yourself if you happen to be in Madrid, at the UN Climate Change Conference, COP 25.

Uncertain future for rock art in Norway

Regular protective treatment of rock carvings and paintings has done a good job protecting this important part of Norway’s cultural heritage. But according to the current schedule, the unique programme will end next year.

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From royal crown to a crown of thorns

Church art from the Middle Ages reflects the dramatic societal changes that were underway during this period. Artists changed the way they depicted Christ from a regal figure with a crown of gold to a suffering Christ with a crown of thorns.

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Cheerful Madonna with a lot of bling

A Madonna figure from Grong municipality is one of the best preserved and special church sculptures in Norway from the Middle Ages. She looks like a sweet, friendly girl who’s been asked to model for the sculpture.

So what is “gand” sorcery – really?

Some people may have heard about the magical phenomenon of gand. When life seems to be against you or you’re plagued by one misfortune after another, you might jokingly say that you’ve been ‘ganda’ if you’re Norwegian. But what did gand really look like and why do we associate it with the Sami people?

Vikings conquer Disney World

Disney World wants to showcase archaeological artefacts from the NTNU University Museum for millions of Florida visitors.

Stinky city air as climate art

Imagine breathing polluted New Delhi air. It’s a scorching 40 degrees and the humidity is high. But you’re not in New Delhi – you’re in an art installation, during the Starmus festival in Trondheim in June.

A “wow” ending of fog, jazz poetry and a tuba

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Edvard and May-Britt Moser finished their Nobel lecture with a music video where NTNU music professors improvised over a Norwegian folk tune. The video was filmed in a dense fog where viewers see the faces of the musicians as they play.