Social anthropology

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Gaming their way to sustainable development

Researchers wanted to involve local people living around Kenya and Tanzania’s Serengeti-Mara parks in developing a sustainable future for them and the parks. They developed a board game to get people talking to the researchers — and to each other. That game has now won an international award.

What young people ask about when guaranteed anonymity

An analysis of almost 300,000 unsolicited questions written by young Norwegians on the website ung.no, has provided major insights into what they’re really interested in today. Their bodies, health and identity are among the topics heading the list.

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Norway’s long tradition of brewing Christmas beer

Norwegian breweries have been producing commercial Christmas beer over the last several centuries. Today’s variety of craft-brewed Christmas beers are among the most important for Norwegian breweries, says NTNU beer enthusiast Anders Christensen.

Ecolabels alone don’t work

NTNU researchers wanted to see if labelling products and putting up signs in stores would encourage more consumers to buy sustainable seafood. The results showed that customers bought significantly more seafood generally – including options that were not sustainably harvested.

Big data doesn’t prevent terror

We leave behind digital traces all the time. This information reveals a lot about people. But it won’t help us catch terrorists, one researcher says.

Prison garb? No thanks!

Inmates are issued a starter pack of prison clothes upon arrival. Many would rather use their own clothes as a way to reclaim some power for themselves.

What is community, really?

A community can be anything from people gathered at the same type of music festival to commuters who recognize each other on the train, a quick meeting with colleagues in the cafeteria or an online chat group.

Japan’s cuteness phenomenon is hundreds of years old

You’ve seen the pictures and the products: Japanese teenage girls in a pastel little-girl world, and children and adults who love Hello Kitty products. They’re all part of the Japanese kawaii phenomenon, which actually started several hundred years ago.

Your new office serves lattes

More and more people are heading to coffee shops to do work. And at the same time they’re changing cafe culture.