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Making ultrasound universally accessible

Currently, ultrasound machines are operated primarily by specialists because it requires extensive experience to interpret the images. Norwegian researchers are aiming to tackle this issue.

Successful utilisation of every single gramme of fish

The rest raw materials left after a salmon has been filleted are equivalent to more than 60 percent of its slaughtered weight. It will soon be possible to convert these into a high-quality fish oil, taste-neutral fish proteins, fish gelatin and flame-retardant materials. Ensuring that not a single gramme goes to waste.

Mann i hvit frakk sitter på laboratorium der han ser på solcelle han holder i hendene.

Searching for the secret to more efficient solar cells

The search for the perfect solar cell is not yet over. Norwegian researchers are now adopting a new approach to the cells’ raw material, crystalline silicon, with the aim of making the electricity-generating cells even more efficient.

Sound beacons support safer tunnel evacuation

Research conducted as part of the project EvacSound demonstrates that auditory guidance using sound beacons is an effective aid during the evacuation of smoke-filled road tunnels. This is good news. It is a fact that vehicle drivers and passengers cannot normally expect to be rescued by the emergency services during such accidents.

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Interrupted breathing during sleep – a widespread disease with no cure

Every fifth Norwegian suffers from the widespread disease obstructive sleep apnea. Several treatment options exist, among them surgery, however results are unpredictable and of variable quality and differ from individual to individual. What determines if the treatment is successful or not? Our scientific research using mathematical airflow models may help the medical doctors to find the answer.

Getting the body to make its own cancer drugs

Imagine that we could instruct our bodies to make the drugs they need themselves. The gene technology that makes this possible is called mRNA therapy, which may become a major tool in the treatment of multiple diseases. Norwegian researchers are currently helping to develop a drug of this kind to treat the most aggressive form of breast cancer.

Ten tips for productive online meetings

We are meeting as never before – online. Particularly in connection with our jobs this may present challenges, but it can also be very productive. Here is some advice from researchers for smart meetings in the virtual environment.

“Seaweeds may become a profitable piece in the green transition jigsaw”

A unanimous group of research scientists are convinced that kelp may share many of the applications of soya and oil, and that they can also be used to capture CO2. Seaweeds can contribute towards climate-friendly solutions in all sorts of contexts. New know-how about seaweed farming is currently accelerating industrialisation of the sector.

Cement factories can put the brakes on global plastic pollution

Researchers believe that plastic refuse can be used as fuel in cement factories in Asia. If this works, it may provide a solution to two of the planet’s biggest environmental problems – plastic in the oceans and high levels of coal consumption.

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Teaching robots to see and feel

Newly developed technology has given robots the ability to learn new skills, enabling them to perform complex tasks and work alongside humans. This innovation can benefit many crucial societal functions, such as food production

New job in the time of corona?

Now that “everybody” is working from home, it can be challenging for companies to recruit and onboard new employees. How can the new hires be productive and feel that they belong in the workplace when they are working from home? According to scientists, there are good guidelines for dealing with this and therefore no reason to delay action.

How tiny water droplets form can have a big impact on climate models

Droplets and bubbles are formed nearly everywhere, from boiling our morning coffee, to complex industrial processes and even volcanic eruptions. New research from SINTEF and NTNU in Norway, improves our understanding of how these bubbles and droplets form. This could improve our ability to model climate change.

Working from home does not make us less productive

Current research into teamwork is showing that we do not become less productive working from home, provided that we work intelligently and are equipped with tools that enable us to work together with our colleagues. In this article, researchers will be advising us not only on what works, but also on what isn’t so smart.

Cracking the code to sea cucumber farming

Sea cucumbers are internationally known as a superfood, as they contain many healthy substances. They are highly sought after by both Chinese restaurants and health food manufacturers. However, many sea cucumber species are threatened with extinction, so researchers want to farm them commercially – on land.

A revolution in vaccine development – but will we all benefit?

By manipulating the “instruction manuals” that control cell function in our bodies, we will soon be able to combat many diseases, including the new coronavirus outbreak. However, in the worst scenario, such innovations will only benefit the rich.

Preparing ourselves for extreme events

As wildfires raged through the Swedish forests in 2018, a new set of European resilience management guidelines for dealing with crises was demonstrating its potential usefulness to decision-makers. Applying these recommendations can save many lives and protect major infrastructure assets during cross-sectoral accidents and crises.

Your sewage is valuable muck

A world without phosphorous is a world without life.  But phosphorous is a finite resource, so researchers are recovering it from sewage.

A new thermal insulation bag will save lives

It is very likely that the human body develop hypothermia following an accident. Maintaining a patient’s body temperature on the way to hospital can be crucial to survival. The prototype of a new and improved solution is now ready.

How much microplastic is there in your laundry basket?

Every time you wash clothes, you are releasing microplastics into the sea, but we know little about the amount and distribution of such material from different types of textile. Research scientists are now working on measuring and capturing microplastics in our laundry.

SF6: The Truths and Myths of this Greenhouse Gas

The atmospheric concentration of the highly-potent greenhouse gas SF6 has never been higher. Fingers have been pointed at the expanding renewables industry, but is that a fair assessment?