Newsletter

Laste ikon
LOADING CONTENT

Snake robot turned movie hero

In the new Norwegian-produced disaster film North Sea, the snake robot Eelume plays a crucial role. Norwegian researchers and a Norwegian company are behind the newly released film.

DeepMReye: an AI that reads your eyes

You may think that they’re random movements, but they’re not: The way you use your eyes when perceiving the world around you reveals something significant about you and how you engage with the world. It can even be a diagnostic of brain disease.

Goat in field with device around its neck

CyborGoats find their way into Norwegian villages

Goats are smart animals. A new technology takes advantage of their intelligence — so they longer need physical fences. More than 2400 Norwegian farmers are already using the technology to herd their animals.

NOTES

The North Sea can drive the green energy transition

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and SINTEF have travelled to the UN climate change conference, COP26, with three strong recommendations on how the North Sea can power the green energy transition.

Boy talking with male friend while walking in school corridor

Transition to lower secondary school is positive for most pupils

Lower secondary school means grades, more tests and more freedom. On top of all that you have the major physical developments that the body is undergoing. Yet the vast majority of pupils find the transition to lower secondary school positive, according to research from NTNU.

Two attractive young people met in the street and they are happy

Pandemic has people hungering to be touched

Many people have been robbed of a very basic need during the pandemic: physical contact. Human touch triggers hormones like serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin. Hormones that make us feel good flourish when we touch each other.

Shedding light on Nature’s tiniest building blocks

These research scientists are studying Nature’s own nanomaterials – applying tools and methods that are normally used for something quite different. Their work has provided us with knowledge that may revolutionise everything from medical treatments to building constructions. 

Glasgow climate talks and the fate of the planet

Just over two months after UN Secretary-General António Guterres described a new climate report on the state of the planet as “code red for humanity”, the nations of the world have the chance to do something about it. But will they?