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Eagle-eyed subsea camera

A new subsea camera has been developed that can see two to three times further under water than existing cameras and calculate distances to objects. This will make work carried out under water much easier.

Andelen barn med eksem har skutt i været siden 1960-tallet i industrialiserte land. For å forebygge barneeksem, viser studier at mors inntak av Biola er effektivt. Foto: Thinkstock

Cultured milk for mom prevents eczema in kids

A daily glass of the cultured milk product called Biola for mom while she is pregnant, and during the first months of breastfeeding helps prevent eczema in children up to the age of six.

Mirror, mirror, will I have a heart attack?

A new smart mirror containing technology developed by NTNU researchers uses 3D-scanners and cameras to make measurements while you brush your teeth, giving you answers about your health minutes later.

Iron-age Norwegians liked their bling

Norway’s Main Air Station at Ørland will be expanded to house the country’s new F-35 fighter jets. Archaeologists called in to examine the expansion site before construction have found evidence of Iron Age longhouses, complete with glass shards, beads and lots of garbage.

Electrical car seen while charging its battery

Norway’s EV purchasing spree is climate friendly

If every other passenger car in Norway is plugged into the electric network by 2020, Europe will have to produce more electricity – mainly from coal-fired power plants – to meet the demand. But it will be a plus for the climate nonetheless.

The professor who misses his tail

Professor Dag Svanæs has lectured at Stanford University and is inspired by the philosophers Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. He has also had a furry mechanized tail that he still sometimes misses.

Risk-takers are smarter

Do you often take chances and yet still land on your feet? Then you probably have a well-developed brain.

Men have the best sense of direction

But when women got a drop of testosterone under the tongue, several of them were able to orient themselves better in the four cardinal directions.

ABC — anything but coal

Policymakers, industry and government officials will have to invest US $2.5 trillion for electricity generation over the next 20 years. A new report presents the environmental costs and benefits linked to different renewable energy sources, and makes one thing abundantly clear: anything is better than coal.

Will our cultural heritage stand up to freak rains?

Using an old 19th century apartment block in Oslo as a case study, researchers are looking for conservation measures for heritage buildings. How can we make them watertight, insulated and protected against future climate change?

TB forgotten in fight against HIV

Tuberculosis seems to have fallen between the cracks in poverty-stricken Malawi’s sponsor-dependent health sector. The dominating focus on HIV may have left parts of Africa with a skewed health service, say researchers.

Climate: a challenging type of justice

What makes a fair climate agreement? The fight for justice has been one of the biggest problems in all international climate discussions. The summit in Paris will likely be no exception.

Taking care of elderly wells

Thousands of old offshore oil wells will have to be plugged to prevent them leaking. The process may cost several hundred million Norwegian kroner, and you and I will have to find most of the money. Researchers are now proposing a solution that may offer some relief for what is a major headache for the Norwegian state.

Good or bad innovation ideas?

The traditional way of running a project with a beginning and an end will soon be history. The scientists have a smarter solution.

Towards a bioeconomic future

Can our forests, seaweed, grass and fisheries waste be transformed into new and valuable raw materials? Researchers are asking 1500 Norwegian companies what they’re currently doing with their resources, and what they see themselves doing in 2030.