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Redundant egg layers can become food

Three million egg-laying hens are destroyed each year. Researchers believe that this practice is inadequately sustainable and want to see the hens exploited for food, oils and proteins.

Cutting nano-wire

Earlier this year, students and employees at NTNU’s Nanolab cut a 100-nanometre thick platinum wire. That’s a thickness of just one ten-thousandth of a millimetre.

Suit seams affect speed

When racers are chasing hundredths of seconds, the difference between winning and losing is tiny. The type of fabric and seam locations can determine whether a cyclist makes it onto the podium or not

Computer games for classroom teaching

Computer games can help improve instruction. Pupils learn more. Teachers get a better overview of what and how well their students are learning.

A new look at corruption and greed

Substantial revenues from natural resources bring opportunities, but also problems, in developing countries. A new research project will look at best practices in resource management.

Carving up the global carbon pie in a new way

When negotiators come to Paris this December to discuss a binding and universal agreement on controlling climate change, they have to know how much each country contributes to the greenhouse gas emissions problem. A new method offers the best hope yet for accurately accounting for these emissions by providing the right incentives and assigning fair responsibilities.

Here’s how Norway can be a leader in global health

The health of people all over the world is dependent on a slew of different variables, so interdisciplinary work is vital to professionals in global health. Twenty-two European countries, the USA and South Africa are all taking part in a comprehensive Norwegian global health survey.

Poling to victory

Female cross-country skiers who want to excel would do well to be inspired by Marit Bjørgen’s muscular upper body. Poling power appears to be a decisive factor in distinguishing the best cross-country skiers in the world from the rest.

Automatic drug dispensers empower the elderly

Sixteen elderly people in a Norwegian municipality have been testing an automatic drug dispenser at home in their living rooms. Results include increased feelings of empowerment, time saved by the home care services, and fewer medication errors.

A photographer’s favorite photos

People from NTNU travel around the world to do research. Photograph Per Harald Olsen has documented a number of these trips. He also has some advice for photographers who would like to take pictures like his.

Hip protector saves you when you slip

Are you well used to wearing studded shoes in winter? If so, you’re probably ready for yet another step towards tackling the eternally icy winter streets.

SAMCoT

Working safely to protect a cold, remote place

Researchers with NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology centre don’t just study health, safety and environment (HSE) issues in their research in the High Arctic – they live HSE first hand. That first-hand experience makes industry safer, and protects the Arctic’s fragile environments.

Predicting a safe lifetime for risers

More than 90 percent of Brazil’s petroleum reserves are found in deep water or ultra-deep water areas offshore. Researchers at SINTEF’s Brazil office are using advanced modelling and testing, including neural networks, to improve the lifespan and safety of a key component used to exploit these deep water reserves.

Norway needs good climate laws

Norway needs its own climate laws, but these laws will only be effective if they are good. Bad climate policies may be worse than none at all, according to NTNU researchers and policy makers.

Fishing vessel transformed into a wave power plant

Is it possible for a redundant fishing vessel to be used as a power plant? Absolutely! The first vessel of its kind is now anchored offshore in the Stadthavet area west of Ålesund, Norway, with the aim of generating electricity from the natural forces of the sea.