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A “light switch” in the brain illuminates neural networks

Researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute of Systems Neuroscience are now able to see which cells communicate with each other in the brain by flipping a neural light switch. The results of their efforts are presented in an article in the 5 April 2013issue of Science magazine.

Choking on their own growth

The population of the world’s cities is growing by 60 million people a year. What can urban planners do?

Order out of chaos

“With automated construction, you can just go in and change one parameter, and suddenly the whole design adapts to the change.”

Ghana puts its hope in oil

Norway is helping Africa’s youngest oil nation with a prescription for prosperity – and is finding out that learning goes both ways.

Driller thriller

Drilling an oil well is not what it used to be. The job needs its own special tools, the dexterity of a pilot, and bundles of experience.

Stress alarm for smoke-divers

Smoke-divers are exposed to high temperatures, physical exhaustion and stress. A new sensor system lets them know when the body has had enough.

Beating the winter blues

The lack of sufficient daylight in northern climes makes many tired and depressed. But don’t worry, researchers have come up with ways to counteract the winter blues.

The many maps of the brain

Your brain has at least four different senses of location – and perhaps as many as 10. And each is different, according to new research from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience.

Lobster baby boom

Researchers have recently succeeded in doubling survival rates among lobster larvae. This could boost populations of a species threatened in the wild.

Ivory gulls in trouble

High levels of contaminants are linked with thinner eggshells in the ivory gull, a red-listed high Arctic seabird.

When the doctor is out

Training community medical officers to do acute surgery is saving lives in the small west African country of Sierra Leone.

New material may replace silicon

Norwegian researchers are the world’s first to develop a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. This finding may revolutionise the technology industry.

The jacket that talks to Facebook

Collision. Fire. Accidents. Chaos. In a rescue operation, it’s no use trying to communicate via a small mobile phone display. But a jacket – now you’re talking!

Polar perils

Activity in the Arctic is on the increase, but how safe is it to operate there?