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A reactor’s secret life

What happens inside chemical reactors and furnaces has always been a well-kept secret. Until now.

What do we do when a well blows out?

Oil and gas companies are worried about gas discharges at the sea bed. Recent field experiments can now quantify the volumes of gas reaching the sea surface and how they spread in the atmosphere.

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.

Small capsules, big potential

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints. Their find has just been published in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

Digital human face

“Virtual human” unlocks key mechanisms of high blood pressure

Scientists regularly use computer models to understand complex problems, from predicting the weather to designing boats and automobiles. Now they are also using this approach to better understand the human body — including the causes behind high blood pressure.

Lopwood and brushwood make high-grade charcoal

When the forestry machines have finished extracting timber, what is left are tops and branches – waste which cannot be used. However, according to researchers, it is possible to turn these heaps of lopwood into high-quality charcoal.

Norwegian ultrasound technology in Cape Town

Norwegian researchers have installed a system that uses 3D ultrasound and image guidance in one of Africa’s biggest children’s hospitals. This could make it easier to treat brain diseases in children.

Regional cures for planetary fever

There is still hope for the climate, even if a world-wide climate accord proves to be unattainable. A new report shows that regional measures can hold the global rise in temperature within the two-degree limit.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Viking raids protected precious artefacts

A bit of British gold stolen in a Viking raid was given a new life when it was used as jewellery and buried with its new Viking owner. That twist of fate may have inadvertently saved a piece of one of the oldest known British croziers.

Hidden in plain sight

DNA barcoding is an invaluable tool in helping biologists understand biological diversity.