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One of 830 scientists behind the climate report

When the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change releases its new report on “Mitigation of Climate Change” on 13 April, NTNU Professor Edgar Hertwich’s contribution as one of the lead authors of the Energy Systems chapter will amount to exactly 5 pages.

Lifesaving sensor for full bladders

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death. The first tests on humans will be carried out in April on patients with spinal injuries at Sunnaas Hospital in Norway.

Carbon capture and storage essential to reach climate target

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is essential if the EU’s climate target is to be reached in a cost effective way. Extensive governmental support in the form of subsidies is necessary to support early implementation of this technology.

Silicon carbide puzzle solved

No one has ever been able to process silicon carbide in such a way that it can be thermally sprayed as a lightweight, extremely durable coating on machine parts. That was before Fahmi Mubarok began his doctoral research.

Norwegian IT researchers are the best in the world

International IT researchers have limited contact with the industry, and tend to stay in their offices, working on concepts and studies. Norwegian researchers work closely with companies – and win awards

Crash course

As the Arctic Ocean’s summer ice cap melts away, new trans-Arctic shipping routes will open and see a growing amount of shipping traffic. But what’s the best way to protect ships and other ocean structures if they crash into icebergs?

Water-mist prevents rain of sparks

Fire researchers have shown that sparks from a burning house can be prevented from spreading if the loft is fitted with an extinguishing system based on water-mist, i.e. tiny water droplets that turn into steam.

Urgent need to recycle rare metals

Rare earth metals are important components in green energy products such as wind turbines and eco-cars. But the scarcity of these metals is worrying the EU.

Focus on local sushi ingredients

Sushi is more popular than ever. However, many of the ingredients are imported from Asia. But Norwegian researchers are now cultivating an alternative to the popular Wakame seaweed salad that doesn’t have to travel thousands of miles.

Men are most forgetful

Your suspicions have finally been confirmed. Men forget more than women do. Nine out of ten men have problems with remembering names and dates, according to an analysis of a large Norwegian population-based health study.

Mining ocean treasures

Underwater mining is a growing industry. Norway might be mining gold from 2000 metres below sea level in just a few years.

The beauty of the battlefield

Battlefield tourists are on the hunt for the beautiful in the ugly. Meaning in the meaningless. And sometime timeless in the past.

Seminavis robusta, stained with Aniline Blue, autofluorescence chloroplasts

Learning from algae

By controlling the sex life of algae, scientists can promote the properties they want.

Northern lights

Secrets of the High North

The Norwegian arctic island archipelago of Svalbard offers scientists the chance to investigate some of the most intriguing – and perplexing – puzzles facing the high north.

A “light switch” in the brain illuminates neural networks

Researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute of Systems Neuroscience are now able to see which cells communicate with each other in the brain by flipping a neural light switch. The results of their efforts are presented in an article in the 5 April 2013issue of Science magazine.

Choking on their own growth

The population of the world’s cities is growing by 60 million people a year. What can urban planners do?

Order out of chaos

“With automated construction, you can just go in and change one parameter, and suddenly the whole design adapts to the change.”