WITH VIDEO

Robots that look like us

Japan is at the forefront of building all kinds of different robots, from industrial machines to robots that look like humans and can talk to us. The only purpose for these humanoid robots is to make us happy.

Show your fingers to a neuroscientist

By comparing your index and ring fingers, a neuroscientist can tell if you are likely to be anxious, or if you are likely to be a good athlete.

Andelen barn med eksem har skutt i været siden 1960-tallet i industrialiserte land. For å forebygge barneeksem, viser studier at mors inntak av Biola er effektivt. Foto: Thinkstock

Cultured milk for mom prevents eczema in kids

A daily glass of the cultured milk product called Biola for mom while she is pregnant, and during the first months of breastfeeding helps prevent eczema in children up to the age of six.

Mirror, mirror, will I have a heart attack?

A new smart mirror containing technology developed by NTNU researchers uses 3D-scanners and cameras to make measurements while you brush your teeth, giving you answers about your health minutes later.

Men have the best sense of direction

But when women got a drop of testosterone under the tongue, several of them were able to orient themselves better in the four cardinal directions.

Family’s hereditary cancer gene found

When almost a third of a hundred members of one family had cancer, or were cured of cancer, researchers began to look for a cancer-causing gene in the family. They found it after fifteen years of genetic testing.

Bad project management costs Norway millions

NTNU professor Wenche Aarseth collected information from several hundred project managers who together had done business in 39 countries. These answers gave her a recipe for success for global projects that cross national borders.

Cycling helps ease arthritis pains

After ten weeks of hard workouts on a spinning bike twice a week, a group of women with arthritis found that their joints were less inflamed.

NOTES

Discovery Channel Canada visits NTNU and Trondheim Fjord

The science program Daily Planet has 8 million viewers. During the last week of June, a production crew from the program filmed an expedition to look for a plane wreck from the Second World War that is located on the bottom of Trondheim Fjord.

Breast cancer is routinely overdiagnosed in Norway

For every life saved from breast cancer by the Breast Cancer Screening Programme, five women are over-diagnosed, and have to go through an operation to remove a tumour that otherwise never would have caused problems.

How should Norway legalize egg donation?

He made one of Norway’s first test tube babies. Now Professor Arne Sunde says that the Norwegian Biotechnology Council’s proposal for an egg donation programme in Norway is so poorly conceived that they should have just said no.

No one wants to foot the bill for new antibiotics

Too many people die from infections related to injuries as little as a splinter in their finger. Scientists think the government strategy to address the problems posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is too narrow. Speeding up the development of new antibiotics will only happen when cancer can no longer be treated with modern medicine.

New app can help parents detect jaundice

Over half of all infants in the world develop jaundice after birth. Annually over 100,000 infants die as a result of the condition, and increasing numbers of afflicted children are growing up with brain damage

Gala dress with grid cell glitter

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: When May-Britt Moser accepts the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her co-laureates Edvard Moser and John O’Keefe, she’ll be wearing a custom-made gala dress created by a designer who until a year ago was a tunnel engineer.

Important to cultivate young academic talents

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Teachers need to recognize students who burn with curiosity and cultivate that inquisitiveness, 2014 Nobel Laureates May-Britt and Edvard Moser said Monday in a special panel discussion on Science in Scandinavia organized by the Norwegian Embassy in Stockholm.

A “wow” ending of fog, jazz poetry and a tuba

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Edvard and May-Britt Moser finished their Nobel lecture with a music video where NTNU music professors improvised over a Norwegian folk tune. The video was filmed in a dense fog where viewers see the faces of the musicians as they play.

Abuse can lead to postpartum depression

Women who experience abuse from someone they know have an 80 per cent higher chance of developing postpartum depression as women who have never been abused.

Nasal spray treats heroin overdose

There is a much greater risk of dying from a heroin overdose in Norway than in a car accident. A new nasal spray aims to help save lives and prevent paramedics from being injured by needles used on drug addicts.

Før professor Egil Lien går inn i laboratoriet, må han ta på seg tett maske, skotrekk, hårnett og heldekkende frakk som avviser bakterier.

The Black Death bacteria continues to kill

It took almost six months for Egil Lien to get permission from the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the US to study the plague bacteria that, in its time, killed half of Norway’s population. Now, an antibiotic-resistant strain of the bacteria has been found.

Practicing nursing care in a virtual world

While Facebook wants to make the world’s best online games using the Oculus Rift headset, NTNU researchers are using the same set-up to help teach nurses how to communicate better.

Viruses that play hide and seek

Every year, two million children die of acute respiratory infections. Among the culprits are several different viruses, one of which your child almost certainly has had without you or the doctors ever knowing it.

The cancer that kills men

Severely ill prostate cancer patients are helping researchers test a diagnostic tool that involves injecting a radioactive substance into their bodies. Norway has the fifth highest mortality rate for prostate cancer in Europe.