Sustainability. Jack Liu.

Why there is still hope for our planet

Is it too late to save our planet? Professor Jianguo Liu is the newest winner of The Gunnerus Award in Sustainability Science. He offers us some hope.

How terrorism affects our attitudes

Some types of terrorist acts affect people much more than others. Islamist violence apparently produces the strongest counter-reactions.

man in winter coat

Is it really selfish to complain about electricity prices?

Norwegians are not necessarily being selfish by wanting to go back to the good old days of cheap electricity. Nor do people think it is acceptable to use the situation for some to enrich themselves at the expense of others, says the researcher.

Patients like public health services best

Many countries have introduced market competition and privatization in their health care systems in recent years. But the most satisfied patients can be found in countries where a large part of the system is handled by the public sector.

Darwin’s giant daisies and evolution

How animals and plants adapt to the environment is often particularly evident on islands. Now Darwin’s giant daisies are helping researchers understand a little more about how these plants actually go about adapting.

Thousands of environmental bombs under Norwegian homes

Heating with oil in homes and commercial buildings is now banned in Norway. The storage tanks are supposed to be removed from buildings, but many people choose not to get rid of these environmental time bombs.

Flirting. The photo shows eye contact.

This kind of flirting works best

Some people succeed at flirting more often than others. Plenty of people are obviously more attractive than the rest of us, but it also seems that a lot of them know what works. Now researchers do, too.

boys playing soccer

Passion has its rewards

Passion determines whether you become the best of the best, including when it comes to football.

Illustration photo of peacock with feathers out

Nature’s colours can replace toxic pigments

Dye pigments are often toxic, so researchers around the world have long been looking for effective ways to make non-toxic, recyclable and sustainable colours instead. The answer lies in nanotechnology and nature’s own methods.