UN Sustainable Development Goals: Life Below Water

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Just one degree can change a species

Even seemingly small changes in the climate can change the number of animals and plants in an area and how species behave, new research shows. Natural history collections provide valuable insights.

fibre-optic Icebreaking Vessel In Arctic at sunset

Eavesdropping on the Earth itself

This summer, a coalition of researchers led by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology reported the first-ever use of a fibre-optic cable network to eavesdrop on whales in the Arctic. Now they suggest these networks be used to establish a low-cost global ocean-earth observatory.

More efficient ocean mapping and monitoring

Australia has a seafloor monitoring program where they can precisely surveil the changes in the environment. NTNU has attracted one of the key researchers from this project. Oscar Pizarro’s research goal is to find tools to facilitate continuous observation with less resources.

Bildet viser Lena van Giesen gjemt delvis bak en korall.
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ERC support for coral research

Lena van Giesen, an associate professor at NTNU’s Department of Biology, was awarded EUR 1.7 million by the European Research Council (ERC) to study larval development of the coral Lophelia pertusa as well as its environment.

Crowding-induced stress gives mackerel the blues

Researchers have succeeded in showing that mackerel turn blue when under stress. This new knowledge will better enable our fisheries to safeguard fish welfare and will optimise catch quality into the bargain.

Sustainability. Jack Liu.

Why there is still hope for our planet

Is it too late to save our planet? Professor Jianguo Liu is the newest winner of The Gunnerus Award in Sustainability Science. He offers us some hope.

Testing lice traps on the Hardanger coast

Researchers at NINA, the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, and NTNU have developed a new method for monitoring salmon lice larvae along the coast. The lice trap is now being tested in the Hardangerfjord.

Coastal marshlands are the place between land and sea

An ‘unknown’ ecosystem that is good news for the climate

At the boundary between the land and sea, there exists an ecosystem that has been overlooked by Norwegians for so long that it was only recently given an official name. But studies are revealing that it has some very desirable properties.

Eavesdropping on whales in the high Arctic

The Earth’s oceans are crisscrossed with roughly 1.2 million km of fibre optic telecommunication cables — enough to girdle the planet 30 times. Researchers have now succeeded in using fibre in a submarine cable as a passive listening system, enabling them to listen to and monitor whales.

Norwegian rivers need to be better protected

When hydroelectric power plants suddenly switch off the water, we risk killing fish fry and other living organisms in rivers. The regulations need to change, say scientists and anglers.