Energy and environment

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For how long can you keep warm during a power outage?

Many Norwegian homes can only be heated using electricity. The authors of this blog argue that in the event of an extended power outage, energy-efficient homes will stay warm for much longer than those built according to the minimum regulatory requirements.

Builders rush to learn from the ZEB lab showcase

The ZEB Laboratory has been utilised both as an office building and a sustainable construction laboratory for about two years. It was designed to be the world’s most ambitious ‘climate-adapted building’ and up to now it has been a great success.

Moose in forest, photo by Endre Grüner Ofstad

Moose can play a big role in global warming

Climate researchers have long known that large animals, like moose, could play a role in how much the Earth will warm due to climate change. But the question is, how much? New research shows the answer can be a lot.

New concrete from old buildings

Christian John Engelsen at SINTEF is teaching the world to recycle demolition rubble to make new concrete. Anything and everything can be recycled, he says. What takes time is getting people on board.

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Urgent need to commercialise CCS

At last it is now possible to capture CO2 at industrial scales without state subsidy, and countries across the world should be persuading private industry to identify storage sites that will make a real difference.

Recycling snuff boxes to make new products

Don’t tell me that you haven’t noticed them. Empty snuff boxes littered all over our streets and parks. But instead of being just rubbish, they can now be recycled to make new products.

Just one degree can change a species

Even seemingly small changes in the climate can change the number of animals and plants in an area and how species behave, new research shows. Natural history collections provide valuable insights.

fibre-optic Icebreaking Vessel In Arctic at sunset

Eavesdropping on the Earth itself

This summer, a coalition of researchers led by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology reported the first-ever use of a fibre-optic cable network to eavesdrop on whales in the Arctic. Now they suggest these networks be used to establish a low-cost global ocean-earth observatory.