Medicine

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Proteins in blood test can reveal and predict disease

An analysis of 5 000 proteins from a blood sample is providing valuable information on a variety of diseases we might get or be at risk for. “Sensational” is the word from Christian Jonasson at the HUNT Research Centre about the US-British-Norwegian study.

Exposing bad science in medical research publishing

Some medical research data never get published because they don’t fit in with the pharmaceutical industry’s desired results. Profiled researcher and social commentator Ben Goldacre will shed some light on this very topic when he takes part in NTNU’s The Big Challenge science festival in Trondheim in June.

Well-known drug has less risk for preterm delivery in PCOS

Metformin significantly reduces the risk of late miscarriages and preterm births for women with PCOS. But the drug does not work to prevent gestational diabetes, according to a large Nordic study from NTNU and St. Olavs hospital.

Fewer headaches as you age

That midlife crisis in your 40s actually comes with some benefits. Fewer headaches are one of them.

Norwegian family’s medical mystery solved

Back in the 1970s, a Norwegian family was found to have abnormally high red blood cell counts. Thirty-five years later, researchers succeeded in solving the mystery, thanks to new analytical methods and the latest developments in genetic engineering – and a chance meeting with a Swiss scientist.

Are you at risk for lung cancer?

No, this question isn’t only for people who’ve smoked a lot. Seven factors, including two new ones, can predict whether you have a high risk of developing lung cancer.

Exploring new uses for existing antiviral drugs

Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs work against a range of viral diseases, but developing them can be costly and time consuming. Testing existing anti-viral drugs for their ability to combat multiple viral infections can help.

Turning genes off for better cancer treatment

A treatment that kills the cancer cells in one fell swoop, without causing the patient to feel sick from the medication’s side effects? That’s the goal of new personalized cancer therapies that are being developed across the globe, including at NTNU.

Downsizing can be bad for your health

Organizational downsizing and job loss greatly increase a person’s risk of having to start different medications. Prescriptions for drugs to treat mental health issues are particularly widespread in this group.

Cooled patients are treated differently

What is the best form of first aid for a cold, injured body? Mountain medicine researchers are now co-operating to find the answer. At present there is actually no “best practice” for treating this type of patients.

New technique yields healthier blood vessels after heart surgery

Surgeons often take a blood vessel from your leg to graft onto your heart during a coronary bypass surgery. The practice can lead to scarring in many patients, which in turn can cause another heart attack. A new technique under development may help prevent this problem.

Rare disease challenges ICT researchers

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task.

Simple measures cut sepsis deaths nearly in half

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis.

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly effects on the Sierra Leonean healthcare community not only has repercussions for the delivery of health care now, but on the training of future health care providers involved in an innovative Norwegian surgical training programme.