Electronics

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Simulating her way to better batteries

Do you have a phone or a car that always runs out of juice? Ingeborg Treu Røe is studying batteries that can store more energy and triple the range of your EV.

NTNU cools down CERN

CERN’s two Large Hadron Colliders detectors to get a climate-friendly cooling system upgrade.

New nanomaterial to replace mercury

Ultraviolet light is used to kill bacteria and viruses, but UV lamps contain toxic mercury. A newly developed nanomaterial is changing that.

Electric motors go to print

Even electric motors can be made more environmentally friendly. A Norwegian start-up company is on it.

World’s tiniest circuit takes shape

Components are falling into place for the technology of the future. They can provide smaller, faster and cheaper electronics with minimal energy consumption.

Have you heard about PiezoMEMS technology?

It may sound futuristic, but most of us are already using this technology without really being aware of it. In fact, it’s all about small mechanical systems containing components well under half a millimetre in size. Norwegian researchers are advancing this technology that can be applied to almost everything you can think of.

When 80 microns is enough

Should you care that scientists can control a baffling current? Their research results could someday affect your daily living.

Ambulance drones on the horizon

Would you hop into a driverless drone and let it fly off with you? In a few years you may have the chance to do just that.

Researchers are helping elite skiers to hone their performance

Norwegian cross-country skiing is applying science to analyse how its elite athletes exploit their strengths during training and competition. The aims of this sensor-based research are to give skiers valuable advice about training and help them find the perfect pair of skis.

Sick mother was inspiration behind supersmart phone

Using a smartphone is not easy for older people who have problems with fine motor skills or mild disabilities. So a resourceful engineer enlisted the help of some researchers and took things into his own hands. Now a completely different type of phone will soon be on the market.

Microscopic sensor for more precise radiology treatments

A team of Norwegian, French and Australian researchers is the first in the world to succeed in quantifying the effects of radiation on individual cancer cells. This means that radiation therapies can now be tailored to individual tumours and thus be more effective.

Kon-Tiki2 expedition in Heyerdahl’s wake

The Kon-Tiki2 expedition aims to both reinforce and challenge Heyerdahl’s theories – and NTNU will gather unique research material from the major oceans that the expedition crosses

Preventing air accidents

A Norwegian, satellite-based system aims to ensure that helicopters and light aircraft are prevented from colliding with power lines and other obstacles.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Stress alarm for smoke-divers

Smoke-divers are exposed to high temperatures, physical exhaustion and stress. A new sensor system lets them know when the body has had enough.

Semiconductors grown on graphene

Researchers at NTNU have patented and are commercializing GaAs nanowires grown on graphene, a hybrid material with competitive properties.

Better rescue in major disasters

Earthquakes. Tsunamis. Forest fires and terror attacks. Norway and the rest of the world must be prepared for catastrophes.

A view into you

Ultrasonics improves a surgeon’s view in the removal of tumours from the pituitary gland.