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Astrophysics a field for great discoveries

As a child, Professor Myrheim wondered what the far side of the Moon looked like. Trondheim’s Starmus festival will welcome a trio who has actually been on the moon, and the astrophysicist is excited to hear their lecture. “Perhaps it’s the magic of childhood that lingers on,” he says.

Moonwalkers three

Just 12 Americans have set foot on the lunar surface, and of those, only six are still alive. Three—Buzz Aldrin, Charlie Duke and Harrison “Jack” Schmitt — will be in Trondheim at the Starmus Science Festival to talk about the future of humankind in space.

Climate change, ocean diversity and women in science

Science has made great strides since Svante Arrhenius, the Swedish Nobel Laureate who in 1896 first determined that carbon dioxide from human activity could warm the planet. The same progress hasn’t been made in increasing the number of women in the sciences.

Will send a giant sunflower into space

Imagine a firefly fluttering near a floodlight. Can you see it? Not unless you shade the light coming from the glare of the lamp. This is where the sunflower screen enters the picture.

Stinky city air as climate art

Imagine breathing polluted New Delhi air. It’s a scorching 40 degrees and the humidity is high. But you’re not in New Delhi – you’re in an art installation, during the Starmus festival in Trondheim in June.

Popularizing science the Brian Cox way

Many of the speakers at the Starmus Festival are superstars in their fields of expertise. But few have as many fans as Brian Cox, the researcher who also feels at home in popular culture.

Eradicating extreme poverty

When Jeffrey D. Sachs (62) comes to Norway in June for the Starmus science festival, attendees will need to fasten their seat belts. The economics professor is described as a “battering ram” and a “bully,” who is ploughing his way to a tough goal: the global eradication of extreme poverty.

Look at Eva, 4 months old and standing

With practice, children can stand without support even before they are 4 months old. This is much earlier than has been reported in the literature.

Black holes and other star remnants

Imagine a dog owner with a reflective vest and a black dog without one. In the dark we can see how the dog owner moves, but not the dog. That’s how black holes work, too.

Exposing fake news on social media

Facebook is an important source of not only genuine, but also fake news. But now a new tool has been developed to expose the fakers.

Who in Europe drinks the most?

For the first time, researchers have found a way to compare how much alcohol Europeans drink. And Britain, Ireland and Portugal top off the list.

Pollen may impair pupils’ exam performance

Pollen allergies cause secondary school pupils to do worse on their exams. This can in turn decrease their chances of pursuing their higher education dreams, according to research from NTNU.