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Small satellites offer major commercial opportunities

Small satellites are used mainly to monitor Norwegian territorial waters. However, the scope of applications will widen in the future, and researchers believe that Norway has the expertise to exploit the commercial opportunities these provide.

How tuberculosis hides in the body

The tuberculosis vaccine only works for children. BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) doesn’t protect you as an adult. Now we know more about how the bacterium avoids being detected.

How can people and predators coexist?

Predators and people have lived side by side since time immemorial in the Serengeti National Park region in Tanzania. But strong population growth is leading to greater conflicts.

Controlling problem ice — by cracking it

Most efforts to control ice build-up on structures like wind turbines and solar cells involve creating a surface that repels water. But Norwegian researchers have engineered a different approach that allows ice to form on a surface, but then causes it to crack off.

Who needs prostate cancer treatment?

Many patients are treated for prostate cancer unnecessarily. Norwegian researchers are working to reduce overtreatment, while at the same time detecting the sickest patients. Now they’re receiving EU support.

Destination Brussels – with climate facts in his luggage

SINTEF’s climate change ambassador Nils Røkke is on his way to Brussels looking forward to a new job and new assignments. He has been appointed as Chair of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA). This in a world in which the threats posed by climate change are increasingly being portrayed as “fake news”.

Do you brood too much?

Trying to reduce your brooding by running away from your thoughts or distracting yourself isn’t helpful, but you can overcome negative thoughts by letting them be.

Skill building the right way

Now we know more about how to get really good at something. This is especially useful for people who are engaged in helping others to develop skills and knowledge — and for parents.

A giant subsea snake robot

It most resembles a giant snake undulating through the water. But this snake-like robot can work in the vast ocean depths. And perhaps one of its relatives will be able to travel to outer space.