Faculty of Engineering (IV)

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Climate emissions from air travel 50 per cent higher than reported

A new study that looked at nearly 40 million flights in 2019 was able to calculate the greenhouse gas emissions from air travel for nearly every country on the planet. At 911 million tonnes, the total emissions from aviation are 50 per cent higher the 604 million tonnes reported to the United Nations for that year.

Robots. The picture shows Professor Ingrid Bouwer Utne in a boat.

NOK 29 million to make robots smarter

The EU is funding NTNU professor Ingrid Bouwer Utne’s work to make robots and autonomous systems understand situations better when there is imminent danger and give operators insight into what they are actually ‘thinking’.

Can microplastics be used to make concrete?

Rubber granules from artificial grass pitches will be phased out, but what do we do with the thousands of tonnes of microplastics that are left? NTNU research shows that they can be used in the production of concrete.

W. Ludwig Kuhn

Ultrasound can save fish in hydropower rivers

Shooting sound waves through water can remove dissolved gas that results from hydropower production in rivers. This gas can harm fish. Researchers are now ready to test techniques to reduce the risk in real hydropower plants.

second hand clothes

Second-hand clothing is good, but less is best

Norway will reap major environmental benefits if residents stop sending wearable clothes out of the country, according to a recent study on clothing consumption in Norwegian households.

Seabed mining

Norway will be the first in the world to approve seabed mining. Is it a good idea?

The transition to a greener, renewable economy will require large amounts of minerals, and society has to get them from somewhere. Norwegian politicians have reached an agreement approving deep sea mining, in a proposal that has reaped both cheers and frustration from scientists and activists alike. Here’s what our scientists think.

Climate talks and the way forward

What should power the future’s shipping fleets? How can we change the way we build buildings so that they’re truly climate neutral? If we’re going to actively alter the planet’s climate, how should we study this?

Training underwater robots to find charging stations — on the seabed

NTNU’s largest laboratory – the Trondheim fjord – is something of an Eldorado for researchers developing underwater robots. A charging station has been installed on the seabed, and to ensure the robots can find the shortest route to the charging station, they train in the fjord.

Edgar Hertwich
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An emergency brake for the climate

To limit global warming to 1.5 degrees, the EU’s Science Advisory Board on Climate Change recommends that Europe reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 90-95% by 2040 compared to 1990. Fossil fuels should be phased out as quickly as possible.

A paradigm in conducting hazardous and innovative basic research

NTNU Amos is an expansive ocean research and innovation community that’s composed of both highly honed specialist expertise and an incredibly broad scope of knowledge. It also adheres to a popular Norwegian football strategy: Develop talents by allowing them to do what they do best – and playing to each other’s strengths.

People at Nyhavna in Trondheim.
NOTES

New test arena opened for seafaring robots

The Nyhavna industrial area in Trondheim, which is being developed into a new mixed-use neighbourhood, has seen significant maritime technology research and innovation. NTNU Nyhavna for autonomous vessels is now officially opened.

Listening to Leviathans

Nineteenth-century Norwegian technology helped bring large whale populations to the brink of extinction. Can 21st-century technology help save them?