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The invisible technology

Nanoproducts have slipped into our lives, almost without being noticed. Man-made particles end up in the air, soil and water. What happens to them?

Robot kids

Their brains are still no more advanced than that of a one-year-old, but scientists want robots to be as smart as teenagers – at least.

Super bed sheet

A specially modified, millimetre-thick, super-absorbent bed sheet solves delivery-room problems.

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The genes decide

What causes pre-eclampsia during pregnancy? The answer lies in the mother’s DNA. And perhaps in the child’s father’s.

Frozen in time

If you bury the cat in the garden, will she someday become a fossil?

The lizard wizard

Dag Dolmen stood on a rock in Dzhungaria and knew without looking what was underneath.

Putting a price on green

The most environmentally friendly product in the building materials store could soon be the cheapest too.

An eye for detail

The X-ray detectors of the future are on the way. New technology makes it possible to sort plastics, identify useful minerals in waste and reveal contamination in food and medicines.

Drugs from the sea

For the first time, Norwegian scientists have managed to produce completely new antibiotics from bacteria found in the sea.

Luxury goods

This boy belongs to a minority: He has access to clean, plentiful water, straight from the tap.

Golden carbon

This powder has the colour of our cold northern nights. But it is hot news for everyone who wants to extract more electricity from sunshine.

Moving underground

Scientists from Trondheim are helping Singapore to move its infrastructure underground.

Smart materials

Today’s materials are not like they were before. We now give them properties to safeguard against rust, repel graffiti and store or emit heat.

Good news for pigs

Embedding sperm cells in a gel for artificial insemination increases the fertilization period for cattle and pigs and means more offspring.

Superconductors for industry

The world’s first induction heater with superconductors is based on a Trondheim invention. This technology can bring large savings to the aluminium industry.