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Mom is right — get up off the sofa

A lot of young people struggle with depression, a fact that is especially true for girls. But youth who are physically active are less vulnerable.

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Twenty years of sequencing genes… for better or for worse

It’s been 20 years since the first draft sequence of the human genome was published in the journals Nature and Science. The result led then-President Bill Clinton to state that we are now learning the language in which life was written, and that “doctors will increasingly be able to cure diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, diabetes, and cancer by attacking their genetic roots.”
Sequencing 30 000 genes has changed the world, but in a different way than expected.

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New NTNU method for beating back the coronavirus

NTNU researchers have started testing a COVID-19 test strategy developed in house: saliva samples you take yourself, without involving health personnel. This means that researchers may be able to knock back the coronavirus epidemic faster, more easily and much more cheaply than today. The method is now being tested on NTNU students.

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Preemies at greater risk for mortality in adulthood

The risk of dying from heart disease, chronic lung disease or diabetes in adulthood is twice as high for preemies —premature infants — as for the general population. Even those who were born just two to three weeks before term have a slightly increased risk.

A young man greetings an old woman through a glass window. Both holding their hands on the window from opposite sides

Coronavirus measures have actually been pretty mild

Norwegians are unspeakably tired of the measures imposed by the country’s Minister of Health, Bent Høie. But historian Erik Opsahl says the measures are mild compared to the old days. Imported infection during pandemics used to be stopped by gunfire.

Anatomical laboratory at NTNU

Where the starring role is death

Nine hundred people from Trøndelag county have donated their bodies to research when they die. Why do they do it, and what are the bodies actually used for? Come on into the anatomical laboratory at NTNU.

Bacteria-based concrete offers climate benefits

Ten cubic kilometres of concrete, equivalent to the volume of Mount Everest, are used in construction projects every year, resulting in huge volumes of emissions. But a new eco-friendly cement may help to reduce our global climate footprint.

WITH PODCAST

The Longship that could help save the planet

Everyone knows there’s just too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere — and we’re heating up the planet at an unprecedented pace. In the latest episode of NTNU’s new English-language podcast, 63 Degrees North, we’ll what Norwegian researchers are doing to help address this problem.