UN Sustainable Development Goals: Responsible Consumption and Production

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Long-houl shipping at sea

Ammonia – the key to making long-haul shipping green

Relatively simple adaptation could make the cargo ships of the future completely green. The technology is based on the chemical compound ammonia, some extensive number crunching and one or two engine modifications.

Abandoned cropland should produce biofuels

More biofuels are needed to counteract climate change. But producing them shouldn’t diminish food production or wilderness areas. The solution may be to grow more grass on recently abandoned cropland.

Reveals hungry salmon with sound waves

The feed cost represents about 50 percent of the costs of farming salmon. But how do we know if the salmon is hungry or still full? Researchers have rethought to find answers. The result is less wastage and pollution – and enough food for the salmon.

Successful utilisation of every single gramme of fish

The rest raw materials left after a salmon has been filleted are equivalent to more than 60 percent of its slaughtered weight. It will soon be possible to convert these into a high-quality fish oil, taste-neutral fish proteins, fish gelatin and flame-retardant materials. Ensuring that not a single gramme goes to waste.

Cleaner fish being sacrificed in the fight against salmon lice

Research shows that even fish farmers have doubts as to whether using cleaner fish is an effective delousing method. “Fish farmers tell us that they want a ban on the use of certain species. They’re also very critical of wild-caught cleaner fish being transported,” says researcher Kristine Størkersen. She is one of the scientists who have been helping the Norwegian Food Safety Authority gain an overview of the situation.

Global supply chains as a way to curb carbon emissions

The coronavirus outbreak raised everyone’s awareness of the significance of global supply chains to modern economies. But global supply chains also play an important role in greenhouse gas emissions. How they are managed can either increase or decrease carbon emissions, new research shows.

More people and fewer wild fish lead to an omega-3 supply gap

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential components of healthy diets for both humans and fish. The dramatic increase in fish farming worldwide has boosted the demand for omega-3 fatty acids so much that today’s supply can’t meet demand. Reducing waste and finding new sources can help.