Technology

Laste ikon
LOADING CONTENT

Need to know much more about deep sea mining

The Norwegian government has proposed opening an area of the continental shelf to deep sea mining. NTNU researchers have worked for more than a decade on this issue. They say we have much to learn before Norway can decide if this can become a viable industry.

Ground-breaking knowledge from minute organs grown on microchips

The use of stem cells now makes it possible for us to cultivate so-called organoids, such as tiny versions of a liver, heart or small intestine, in the lab. These micro-organs can then be connected to a microchip that simulates the body’s biological processes. This ‘organ-on-a-chip’ technology opens the door to previously undreamt-of research possibilities.

A technology that gives you instructions – right before your eyes!

These smart glasses first tell you what to do, then check that you’re doing it right, while constantly making sure that you aren’t getting too tired. Future aircraft are among the products that will be manufactured with the help of this innovative Norwegian technology.

VIEWPOINTS

Winter salting caused the crash – not the steel

Speciality steels made the headlines in 2021 following a serious car accident. Normally, alloys of this type corrode very slowly, but they must not be used to construct barriers along roads that are salted in winter. At other places on the road network, the same steels offer long lifetimes and cost savings.

NOTES

Tracking whales as they cruise the Arctic

For the first time ever, researchers have been able to track eight fin whales in near real time for five hours, as they swam along a stretch of fibre-optic cable line in the Arctic. The breakthrough suggests that fibre-optic cable networks could be harnessed to help prevent whale deaths by ship strikes.

smart speaker

When your house spreads gossip about you

Security holes in our smart devices are difficult to detect. Is it possible to automate the search for vulnerabilities? Researchers at NTNU in Gjøvik are on the case.

Carbon capture using sunlight and mirrors

Researchers are planning a solar energy plant that will capture ‘concentrated sunlight’ using mirrors. The plant will also be distinctive because it will generate both electricity and heat, which can be used to capture carbon dioxide.

Cultivating salad plants that can be grown on the Moon

NASA has finished its planning and is ready to go. Humans will soon be returning to the Moon – this time in a manned base. But, if this project is to succeed, astronauts must be able to grow their own food. Norwegian researchers are in the process of making this possible.