Hope for the climate, hope for clean air

Climate talks in New York this week have offered a glimmer of hope that the world’s political leaders finally understand the need to act to curb global warming. An NTNU researcher says that these actions will have a beneficial side effect: cleaner air in some of the most polluted places on the planet.

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly effects on the Sierra Leonean healthcare community not only has repercussions for the delivery of health care now, but on the training of future health care providers involved in an innovative Norwegian surgical training programme.

The Towing Tank turns 75

NTH, Norway’s first technical university and one of the main predecessors to NTNU, SINTEF and MARINTEK, opened in Trondheim in 1910. Just three years later its scientists began to think very big – 170 metres big.

Brown trout or sea trout.
WITH VIDEO

The secret life of the sea trout

Armed with special acoustic tags, a team of researchers is following 50 individual fish for as long as seven months to learn more about their life – and death — in Norwegian fjords.

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Cool climate – clean planet

Ever-rising greenhouse gas emissions and the potential need to deploy untested and expensive climate engineering technologies are just two of the many bits of bad news in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s new report on “Mitigation of Climate Change”, released on 13 April.

Key findings from IPCC

Professors from NTNU present key findings from IPPC on how we can mitigate climate change.

A global challenge

Three climate researchers talk about the latest report from Intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC). In English, French and Italian.

One of 830 scientists behind the climate report

When the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change releases its new report on “Mitigation of Climate Change” on 13 April, NTNU Professor Edgar Hertwich’s contribution as one of the lead authors of the Energy Systems chapter will amount to exactly 5 pages.

Crash course

As the Arctic Ocean’s summer ice cap melts away, new trans-Arctic shipping routes will open and see a growing amount of shipping traffic. But what’s the best way to protect ships and other ocean structures if they crash into icebergs?

Northern lights

Secrets of the High North

The Norwegian arctic island archipelago of Svalbard offers scientists the chance to investigate some of the most intriguing – and perplexing – puzzles facing the high north.

A “light switch” in the brain illuminates neural networks

Researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute of Systems Neuroscience are now able to see which cells communicate with each other in the brain by flipping a neural light switch. The results of their efforts are presented in an article in the 5 April 2013issue of Science magazine.

Ivory gulls in trouble

High levels of contaminants are linked with thinner eggshells in the ivory gull, a red-listed high Arctic seabird.

When the doctor is out

Training community medical officers to do acute surgery is saving lives in the small west African country of Sierra Leone.

New material may replace silicon

Norwegian researchers are the world’s first to develop a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. This finding may revolutionise the technology industry.

Semiconductors grown on graphene

Researchers at NTNU have patented and are commercializing GaAs nanowires grown on graphene, a hybrid material with competitive properties.

Save the planet? Stop eating meat.

Growing and producing food make agriculture and food consumption among the most important drivers of environmental pressures, including climate change and habitat loss.

A spin on the future

The science of spintronics, where the spin of an electron is used to create new technologies, may hold the key to making ever faster and lighter consumer products.