Clinical and Molecular Medicine

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Immune system can detect disease during pregnancy

Researchers at NTNU have surveyed how a mother’s immune system changes during the course of pregnancy. This knowledge can help detect disease and complications, and give the foetus a better start in life.

NICU incubator
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Is it always right to save lives? A radical proposal

In neonatal medicine, there is a grey area where professionals may be uncertain whether it is in the child’s best interests to start life-saving treatment. Without it, the infant dies. But the treatment can also do great harm. One of the foremost duties of medicine is often said to be to “do no harm”. But how much of a burden on the infant is acceptable? At what point is the hope simply too small to justify action?

Mini brains in a petri dish

Mini-brains reveal cause of rare syndromes

The culprit behind a large number of cancerous tumours is known to be a certain protein. Now for the first time, research shows that the same protein is the cause of several rare brain syndromes.

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Nordic prize for excellent research awarded to NTNU professor

The Anders Jahre’s Award for Medical Research for young researchers is awarded this year to Professor Barbara van Loon at NTNU. Several previous winners of the main prize have since received the Nobel Prize in Medicine. This includes May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU.

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Preemies at greater risk for mortality in adulthood

The risk of dying from heart disease, chronic lung disease or diabetes in adulthood is twice as high for preemies —premature infants — as for the general population. Even those who were born just two to three weeks before term have a slightly increased risk.

Anatomical laboratory at NTNU

Where the starring role is death

Nine hundred people from Trøndelag county have donated their bodies to research when they die. Why do they do it, and what are the bodies actually used for? Come on into the anatomical laboratory at NTNU.

Trained medical staff can perform safe, effective hernia surgery

Many low and middle-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, don’t have enough surgeons to perform vital surgeries, such as groin hernia repairs. Training non-doctor associate clinicians in this procedure provides a safe and effective solution, a new study shows.

An x-ray of a skull with holes

Perforated bone tissue from too little sugar

Bone marrow cancer is currently an incurable disease that affects about 400 people in Norway every year. Professor Therese Standal at NTNU has now found an important reason for bone destruction in people with this disease.

NTNU’s new COVID-19 test to be used in India and Denmark

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has signed agreements to deliver as many as one million COVID-19 test kits to DTU, the Technical University of Denmark, and APS LABS, an Indian biotech company. “It is very positive that this technology can now also be useful internationally,” says Bent Høie, Norway’s Minister of Health and Care Services.