Physics

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Predicted skewed waves – and found them

He solved a 127-year-old physics problem on paper and proved that off-centred boat wakes could exist. Five years later, practical experiments proved him right.

World’s tiniest circuit takes shape

Components are falling into place for the technology of the future. They can provide smaller, faster and cheaper electronics with minimal energy consumption.

When 80 microns is enough

Should you care that scientists can control a baffling current? Their research results could someday affect your daily living.

Measuring devices for the world’s most extreme environment

Norwegian research scientists are contributing to the development of the world’s hottest geothermal well in a non-volcanic area. The goal is to exploit the inexhaustible supply of heat from the interior of the Earth, and this calls for equipment that can withstand the most extreme conditions.

The astronaut’s extra nose

How do we protect astronauts in space from breathing dangerous gases? A German-Norwegian hi-tech optical gas sensor provides a solution.

Astrophysics a field for great discoveries

As a child, Professor Myrheim wondered what the far side of the Moon looked like. Trondheim’s Starmus festival will welcome a trio who has actually been on the moon, and the astrophysicist is excited to hear their lecture. “Perhaps it’s the magic of childhood that lingers on,” he says.

Popularizing science the Brian Cox way

Many of the speakers at the Starmus Festival are superstars in their fields of expertise. But few have as many fans as Brian Cox, the researcher who also feels at home in popular culture.

Black holes and other star remnants

Imagine a dog owner with a reflective vest and a black dog without one. In the dark we can see how the dog owner moves, but not the dog. That’s how black holes work, too.