Physics

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fibre-optic Icebreaking Vessel In Arctic at sunset

Eavesdropping on the Earth itself

This summer, a coalition of researchers led by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology reported the first-ever use of a fibre-optic cable network to eavesdrop on whales in the Arctic. Now they suggest these networks be used to establish a low-cost global ocean-earth observatory.

Hermann Göring’s Luftwaffe and the $6 billion deal

How the unlikely combination of WWII Germany, a modest English engineer who created a worker’s paradise, an ambitious industrialist prosecuted as a traitor and a hardworking PhD helped build modern Norway, one aluminium ingot at a time.

Illustration photo of peacock with feathers out

Nature’s colours can replace toxic pigments

Dye pigments are often toxic, so researchers around the world have long been looking for effective ways to make non-toxic, recyclable and sustainable colours instead. The answer lies in nanotechnology and nature’s own methods.

Hunting for dead stars

Neutron stars are the little siblings of black holes and show some of the most extreme phenomena in the universe. The European Research Council (ERC) is giving Professor Manuel Linares EUR 2 million to hunt them down.

Predicted skewed waves – and found them

He solved a 127-year-old physics problem on paper and proved that off-centred boat wakes could exist. Five years later, practical experiments proved him right.

World’s tiniest circuit takes shape

Components are falling into place for the technology of the future. They can provide smaller, faster and cheaper electronics with minimal energy consumption.

When 80 microns is enough

Should you care that scientists can control a baffling current? Their research results could someday affect your daily living.