UN Sustainable Development Goals: Good Health and Well-being

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We move along the surface of a doughnut

Researchers have gained a first insight into how the brain structures higher-level information. By extracting and analysing data from a neural network of grid cells, they found that the collective neural activity is shaped like the surface of a doughnut. The study, from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and collaborators, is published in Nature.

New treatment leads to much less overeating

Patients with morbid obesity experienced improvement in their quality of life and distinctly fewer episodes of overeating after ten weeks with a new treatment method developed at NTNU.

illustration photo, pregnant woman lying in bed. Photo:colourbox

Immune system can detect disease during pregnancy

Researchers at NTNU have surveyed how a mother’s immune system changes during the course of pregnancy. This knowledge can help detect disease and complications, and give the foetus a better start in life.

DeepMReye: an AI that reads your eyes

You may think that they’re random movements, but they’re not: The way you use your eyes when perceiving the world around you reveals something significant about you and how you engage with the world. It can even be a diagnostic of brain disease.

Two attractive young people met in the street and they are happy

Pandemic has people hungering to be touched

Many people have been robbed of a very basic need during the pandemic: physical contact. Human touch triggers hormones like serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin. Hormones that make us feel good flourish when we touch each other.

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Is it always right to save lives? A radical proposal

In neonatal medicine, there is a grey area where professionals may be uncertain whether it is in the child’s best interests to start life-saving treatment. Without it, the infant dies. But the treatment can also do great harm. One of the foremost duties of medicine is often said to be to “do no harm”. But how much of a burden on the infant is acceptable? At what point is the hope simply too small to justify action?