Cutting nano-wire

Earlier this year, students and employees at NTNU’s Nanolab cut a 100-nanometre thick platinum wire. That’s a thickness of just one ten-thousandth of a millimetre.

Computer games for classroom teaching

Computer games can help improve instruction. Pupils learn more. Teachers get a better overview of what and how well their students are learning.

A new look at corruption and greed

Substantial revenues from natural resources bring opportunities, but also problems, in developing countries. A new research project will look at best practices in resource management.

Here’s how Norway can be a leader in global health

The health of people all over the world is dependent on a slew of different variables, so interdisciplinary work is vital to professionals in global health. Twenty-two European countries, the USA and South Africa are all taking part in a comprehensive Norwegian global health survey.

Norway needs good climate laws

Norway needs its own climate laws, but these laws will only be effective if they are good. Bad climate policies may be worse than none at all, according to NTNU researchers and policy makers.

Hug a robot with your grandchild’s voice

How would you feel about robots taking over elder care? It may seem odd to you, but most Japanese wouldn’t even think twice about robots caring for their grandparents.

Secrets of a traditional Norwegian Christmas sausage

Making sausages is not just a question of good ingredients and skill. There’s a little science involved, too. Professor Trygve Magne Eikevik makes his own sausages, and is willing to share his technique and his recipes, especially for Norwegian Christmas sausage.

Gertrude, Tarzan, and the rest of the Nobel gang

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Animal welfare is important for Nobel laureates May-Britt and Edvard Moser. Not just because that is how it should be, but also because the researchers get the best results that way.

A new solution to an age-old equation can improve ship efficiency

It’s been this way for 127 years— the V-shaped wake pattern behind a ship moving in a straight line always has the same central angle. But a Norwegian armed with a pen and a piece of paper has discovered that in certain situations, a boat’s wake can actually be found in front of the boat.

From dried cod to tissue sample preservation

Could human tissue samples be dried for storage, instead of being frozen? Researchers are looking at the salt cod industry for a potential tissue sample drying technology that could save money without sacrificing tissue quality.

Where did Norway’s reindeer come from?

The reindeer is a species that has done well for itself. There are nearly 3 million animals across large areas of the northernmost parts of the world. But where did Scandinavian reindeer actually come from?

Metallgesellschaft, eksisterte som eget selskap fram til midten av 1990-årene, men er i dag en del det verdensomspenneneGEA Center. Bildet er fra selskapets kontor i Düsseldorf. Foto: GEA Center

The hidden companies

They are the companies you’ve never heard of, but they help grease the wheels of international trade.

It’s called a goat boat, but it’s no goat

Are older, classical boat designs really better? High-tech testing in the Ship Towing Tank at the Norwegian Marine Technology Research Institute in Trondheim pits a 16th century classical rowboat against its newer, easier-to-build cousin.

Small capsules, big potential

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints. Their find has just been published in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

Carbon capture and storage essential to reach climate target

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is essential if the EU’s climate target is to be reached in a cost effective way. Extensive governmental support in the form of subsidies is necessary to support early implementation of this technology.